The Xiris Blog

Cornelius Sawatzky

Recent Posts

Rugged, Robust, and Ready to Use - The XVC-S Sub Arc Weld Camera

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Thursday, November 01, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) is a common welding process used in a variety of applications pipe and pipeline fabrication.  In many applications, pipe is tack welded together to hold the pipe in shape, then submerged arc welded from the outside using a continuous process such as on a spiral welded pipe mill, or in butt joining pipe segments using an orbital welding process.  Many of these applications have a very confined or awkward working environment that makes it difficult, if not impossible, for a human to observe the weld process in a production environment.

XVC S Column and BoomAn XVC-S Mounted to a Column and Boom Robot Performing Welding and
Cladding on Large Pipes

In any such welding work environment, whether it be the confined space of a pipe welding application or a high-height welding application such as in large pressure vessel construction, operator safety is always a priority. In the welding industry, workforce demands, government regulations, changing business practices, and increasing environmental awareness are driving the manufacturing environment to be safer, healthier, and friendlier for workers. As a result, the use of camera technology is becoming more prevalent in order to alleviate some of the dangers and liabilities.

While the welding environment is particularly harsh on electronics, the Xiris XVC-S cameras for Sub-Arc welding applications have proven to be very durable and reliable in some of the toughest environments. The XVC-S cameras have been used in hot, confined spaces to provide a clear view of the submerged arc weld torch and its alignment to the weld seam, or in a post-weld application to inspect the weld as the slag comes off the weld bead. The cameras allow the operator to remotely view and manage the welding process by providing the ability to adjust the weld process real-time, ultimately reducing potential subsequent rework.  For the fabricator, this means saving time and money with less machine stops and more on-arc time.

XVC-S ViewThe View of the Sub Arc Welding Process Using an XVC-S Camera

But the benefits of the XVC-S are not just financial: since the XVC-S submerged arc weld camera allows the welding processes to be viewed remotely, operators can monitor the welding process from the comfort of a process control cabinet as the cameras are placed at the weld head.  As a result, welders are no longer required to work in cramped, uncomfortable places or dangerous heights, reducing fatigue and safety issues.

With clearly demonstrated financial benefits from cost savings and improved health and safety considerations, the business case for implementing an XVC-S camera is straightforward.  Don’t you think it’s worth looking into a camera for your sub arc business? Learn more about the XVC-S camera and download the FREE Datasheet for more details. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Topics: submerged arc welding, Sub Arc welding, XVC Weld Camera, pipe, Xiris, Robotic Welding, welding automation, weld inspection

Seam Monitoring for Coil Joining

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, September 04, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

Monitoring the welding process during coil joining at the front end of a tube mill is crucial to the integrity of the weld as it moves through the tube mill.  Coil joint failure can be costly in terms of both time and efficiency of production on the mill. Operator safety must also be maintained by removing them from the direct welding area as much as possible while enabling them to monitor the coil joining process.

Continuous welding processes used in coil joining require real time operator monitoring to ensure that the process continues smoothly and efficiently. The Xiris XVC-1100e50 camera provides a way to do just that.

A recent Xiris customer manufactures thick walled steel pipe in a continuous high frequency welding process at 70 feet (20 m) per minute.  The customer had implemented a semi-automatic coil end joining system on the infeed buffer of the pipe mill, giving the operator about 10 minutes to end sheer, mate and weld a new coil. This is sometimes referred to as end joining.

The welding process used a MIG welding torch mounted onto a linear track with dual axis torch position adjustment via a remote control pendant. With the Xiris XVC-1100e50 camera mounted to the traveling torch assembly, the operator was able to close the curtain, providing greater weld arc shielding while maintaining a clear view of the weld torch-to-seam alignment on a display screen.

The camera provided the operator with a clear, close up view of the weld process, which allowed the operator be remote from the direct welding area.  By providing a clearer image of the weld process, the operator was able to make more consistent welds, reducing the potential for a joint failure as the strip is driven through the pipe making process.

For a video of the coil joining process taken by the XVC-1100e50 camera, please view the video below. 

coil joining

This is just one example of how Xiris products can enhance your manufacturing process. Contact Xiris sales to see how our products can enhance your unique process.

 

Topics: tubedefects, Tube and Pipe welding, coil joining, tube mill, mill

Tracking Tube Production Using the WI2000 and WI3000 systems

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Thursday, June 21, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

Xiris' WeldInspection System Helps Identify the Root Cause of Variations in Tube Production

Many applications require tube producers to identify and document their tubes by batch, date and sometimes even time stamp for trace-ability. If a tube segment fails at a sub process or worse at the end user, a detailed analysis and root cause investigation follows.

 

audit logs 3

Audit Log Files from Xiris' WeldInspection System

When the original tube production date and time information is available, a helpful tool to identify anomalies is to review the audit log files generated on Xiris’ WeldInspection system.The audit log files are date and time stamped and easily accessible to look for any weld related geometries that may have deviated for a time period during the production run.

Variations may be a change in bead shape/size that can be an indicator of squeeze pressure or weld heat change. With the WeldInspection system monitoring multiple geometrical conditions such as mismatch, bead height, width and potential freeze line, much information can be gained by reviewing the log files and identifying a potential root cause. Additionally if a particular condition has been identified as the potential cause, the audit logs can be utilized to determine for how long that condition existed therefore helping reduce the volume of product that might be quarantined for further evaluation.

 

If you are interested in learning more about how our WeldInspection system can benefit you and your company, please contact us here.

 

Topics: Tube and Pipe welding, WI-2000p, tube, defects, pipe, tubedefects

Using Cameras When Welding Spiral Pipe Part 3: Post Weld Inspection

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Monday, December 04, 2017 @ 03:16 PM

Following sub arc welding on the inside and outside of a helically welded pipe, the pipe must undergo inspection to be prepared for further processing or service in the field. This preparation step includes rigorous inspection and testing procedures, repair of defects, and application of anti-corrosion coatings before the pipe enters service.

 

Dec 4 - image 1.jpg

Post-weld Scarfing in helical sub arc welding

Traditionally, post-weld inspection is done manually by an operator who walks around the exterior of the pipe or crawls through it as part of an offline process. The operator is responsible for identifying any weld undercut, incorrect weld wetting angles, or insufficient or excessive weld bead material from the process.  It is not only time consuming, but it relies on the operator to be consistent to be able to catch all defects in the product.

A better solution is to use automatic inspection equipment such as the Xiris WI3000 weld inspection system, which can profile the entire weld bead after the flux has been removed or fallen away to detect problems sooner in the process.  Usually used as an inline inspection tool post-weld, the WI3000 can also be used to provide the operator with feedback to make corrections reducing additional defects while marking the location of a defect to expedite the repair process.

Dec 4 - image 2.png

Laser Bead Profile of a Weld Bead with a Too Steep Slope on the Right Side of the Bead

Information from the laser sensor is transmitted to a single image-processing system, allowing the operator to identify and control the welding parameters.   The end result is a better, more objective measurement of the weld bead inspection process in advance of use of the pipe in the field.

Xiris Automation offers a full suite of products for your helical sub arc welding (HSAW) process. From the control and quality assurance of the initial forming and tacking stage by the XVC-1000, through the remote monitoring of process parameters during full-seam sub arc welding by the XVC-S, and the post-welding and post-scarfing inspection by the WI-3000, Xiris provides operators with the tools they need to prepare the highest-quality products they can.

To learn more about how Xiris Automation’s full suite of turnkey solutions can improve the quality and yield of your HSAW manufacturing process, contact one of our technical specialists today.

 

Topics: Tube and Pipe welding, submerged arc welding, High Dynamic Range

Post Scarf Inspection of Automotive Fuel Line Tubing

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 @ 04:00 AM

Fuel line tubing is typically manufactured on an ERW welding mill similar to traditional seam welded tubing.  Once the tube has been welded, it moves down the mill for further in-line processing that may include reducing, sizing, annealing and coating processes to meet the customer’s needs.

Fuel line tubing must be perfectly round in order to create a good seal when compression fittings are applied to it. The tube surface must be free from longitudinal scratches, grooves or beads in order to prevent a leak path from developing at the interface point of the fittings.

Immediately after the fuel line tube has been welded and before any further in-line processing is done, the weld bead must be scarfed (the process whereby the weld bead is cut off with a knife).  Unfortunately, the scarfing process can be the primary contributor to creating a leak path on a compression fitting because:

1. Insufficient scarfing can leave a small portion of the weld bead protruding from the     surface of the tube. This may be on either one or both sides of the weld bead where scarfing tool positioning is critical.

June 14 Image 1.jpg

Insufficient Scarfing

2. Excessive scarfing may look perfectly round to the human eye however a non-uniform wall thickness may be lurking below the surface. What is not always apparent and usually only observed during thorough end cut inspection is a thinned portion of the tubing wall that may compromise the integrity of the tube. The reducing process applies enough external force to the tube that the tube may buckle or collapse, causing a deep surface groove.


June 14 Image 2.jpg

Excessive Scarfing

3. A mismatched setup may also be a contributor to a non-uniform wall thickness. The scarfing tool may cut the bead on the outside diameter so that it looks perfectly round to the human eye, disguising the compromised wall thickness below the surface. Sufficient mismatch conditions will most certainly cause the tube to split on end forming later in the fabrication process.

June 14 Image 3.jpgMismatched Defect, Post Scarfing

The Xiris WI2000/3000 Weld Inspection System uses laser-based imaging techniques to continually monitor the scarf zone for any variations in the scarf height, seam mismatch and possible scarf tool wear or chips that may cause a longitudinal line on the tube. By detecting and responding to these conditions proactively, a mill operator is able to reduce the chance of a leak path on the tube and avoid an unplanned stoppage to the mill due to a tube collapse during the reducing process.

For more information on how a Xiris Weld Inspection System can enhance your scarfing processes visit Xiris.com 

Don't miss any of our amazing weld videos! Sign up to receive the 

Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: productivity tools, quality control, Tube and Pipe welding, automotive, scarfing, laser-based monitoring

Xiris Helps Tube Producer Eliminate Weld Problems

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 @ 10:08 AM

Xiris’ WI2000 Weld Inspection System measures weld bead and formed tube geometry for tube and pipe producers.  Recently, the WI2000 was featured in an article in the Tube and Pipe Journal, where it was identifed as a major reason why Middletown Tube of Ohio, USA was able to improve its tube quality and reduce its scrap rate.

Providing more benefits than was expected, the WI2000 has helped the tube producer find defects with their mill equipment and setup; catching potential defects before they become failures and cause scrap.  As a result, tube mill setups have become a science rather than an art for Middletown.

Read the full article here.

Blog Nov 16.png

For more information on how Xiris Weld Inspection Systems can improve the quality and productivity of your tube and pipe production, visit Xiris.com 

You may also be interested in our Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: Xiris, welding, productivity tools, quality control, weld inspection, Middletown Tube, Tube and Pipe welding

Latest Posts

Follow Me