The Xiris Blog

Additive Manufacturing Research and Development Made Easier

Posted by Justin Grahn on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 @ 11:38 AM

Additive Manufacturing refers to a process whereby 3D design data is used to build up a component by depositing successive layers of material to create the shape required.  It is also referred to as "3D printing" and can be used to create almost any shape or geometry that is generated from a 3D CAD model.  It is called Additive Manufacturing because material is added together to form a part, distinguished from conventional manufacturing where material is removed to form a part.  

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To form a part, layers of specialized powder or special filament wire can be melted together using a Laser or weld head under a motion system to create the shape required.  This is a fairly new field that is attracting lots of Research and Development to create better processes, powder and wire materials, and bonding techniques.  However, the development process typically requires long run times of the additive manufacturing equipment that is very labor intensive to watch the entire process in real time.

Instead, Xiris Weld Cameras can be used to record the process to produce crisp and clear images of the weld head, laser spot, melt pool and weld bead.  The result is a video of the process in stunning high resolution and clarity, at rates that can exceed 200 frames/sec.  This can allow engineers and scientists to monitor the process live and stop right when an error occurs.  Or, the recorded video can then be played back at a higher speed to allow engineers and scientists to review the process from start to finish and carefully review the events of greatest interest at a lower speed, as required.  This allows the R&D team to focus on the time of defects and errors, by finding out exactly what went wrong with the process by analyzing the recorded video at the time of interest.

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Conclusion

The development effort to improve an additive manufacturing process can be long and tedious.  Using a Weld camera to monitor the process can both help to reduce the labor required to improve the process but also provide better documentation and highlighting of the process variations as they occur.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help with your Additive Manfacturing applications, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld video, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, R&D, LAM, additive manufacturing

The South Dakota School of Mines & Technology Relies on XVC 1000

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 @ 01:00 AM

Recently, Xiris had the pleasure of working with the Additive Manufacturing Laboratory (AML) team at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology.   AML has been using the XVC 1000 camera to assist with its metal additive manufacturing automation process.  AML has used CCD cameras in the past, but according to Joshua Hammell, Research Scientist and AML Lab Manager, “the high dynamic range of the XVC-1000, provides orders of magnitude more information about the process, while removing the need for different optical filters during cold alignment and high temperature processing. This is a major advantage for process automation.” 

The XVC 1000 has been an essential tool for machine and process development, saving the team at AML a great deal of time and money.  The initial plan for the camera was for laboratory use only; however, AML has since decided that the cameras will be integrated into all of its metal additive manufacturing systems for process monitoring during production. 

Details of the current AML process are very confidential but AML has granted us permission to show an older process development video taken with the XVC 1000…

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help with your manufacturing processes, please visit Xiris.com 

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Topics: weld camera, welding automation, Education, welding, laser additive manufacturing, additive manufacturing

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