The Xiris Blog

Weld Safety: Before and After

Posted by Margaret Montgomery on Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 01:37 PM

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, welders and cutters "have one of the highest rates of injuries of all occupations." [1] 

safety before+ after larger

Before installing a weld camera, welders are often perched at unsafe heights, giving them a poor view of their welding activities. 

Welders Work in Precarious Positions

Many welding activities are done at unsafe heights, while the welder attempts to monitor and control the welding process. The moving machinery around them forces them to work in small, constrained working areas- which is often dangerous and uncomfortable for the operator. In these conditions- behind a helmet and perched above the welding process- welders miss important details in the welding arc, which can lead to mistakes and inaccuracies that are costly and timely to fix. Not only are these conditions a safety risk, but they make it harder for welders to ensure that they execute a high quality weld.

Weld Cameras Give Welders an Eye Into Detail

Xiris Automation weld cameras enable workers to perform a weld without leaving the ground. Our solutions give welders a consistent image quality regardless of the angle of the weld. They can view multiple images of the weld from leading, trailing or side views of the weld process. 

 

Don't pay for accidents, prevent them using machine vision technology. 

 

If you are interested in learning more about our company and products, please contact us here.

 

[1]“Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 13 Apr. 2018, www.bls.gov/ooh/production/welders-cutters-solderers-and-brazers.htm#tab-3.

Topics: weld camera, weld safety, arc welding, mig welding, weld camera system

Two Types of Weld Cameras to Help You

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 @ 01:02 PM


Xiris Automation Inc. designs inspection systems, or “machines that can see”. Our products are used for process and quality control and provide some of the world’s most dynamic manufacturers with the ability to detect, recognize, and interpret quality issues in their manufactured goods. These technologies are applied across many different industries to improve safety, efficiency and productivity. We have developed camera technology to help monitor both Open Arc welding and Sub Arc Welding processes which has significantly enhanced the welding industry.


Xiris View Cameras: Open Arc Welding

Welding cameras can make a drastic difference in manufacturing and quality control for Open Arc welding processes such as GMAW (MIG/MAG), GTAW (TIG), Plasma or Laser welding. By integrating a camera at the weld head, fabricators can improve the human interpretation of the weld quality by providing a better image than otherwise possible and therefore decrease the chances of human error. The Xiris View Camera for Open Arc welding (XVC-O) is a complete system that comes with monitor, software, and camera, and can be easily integrated to any automated welding process. Beyond the production line, the system can also be used as a training tool, inside and outside of the classroom. With video recording capabilities, the XVC-O allows instructors to record welds and defects for offline review, analysis and instruction. The result is a better tool to teach welding to more students, as well as a way to introduce a more consistent assessment and review process.

XVC-O_Monitor_image

The XVC-O monitor display

Xiris View Cameras: Submerged Arc Welding

Monitoring Submerged Arc welding is less difficult than Open Arc welding processes because of the blanket of flux that covers the welding process. The blanket of flux used in Sub Arc Welding prevents spatter and sparks but ensuring the alignment and angle of the weld tip is still essential to ensure the quality of the resulting weld. In addition, monitoring the continuously fed wire is another feature that needs monitoring in order to ensure the consistency of pressure of the arc. The Xiris View Camera for Submerged Arc Welding (XVC-S) provides clear images of the weld environment, weld tip and feeder wire to the operator in order to more accurately control the parameters that make a good weld. It also removes operators from potentially hazardous work environments without sacrificing their ability to monitor the weld process.


Welding injuries are far too common in today’s work environment and any steps that can be taken to improve workplace safety as well as productivity should be taken. Just last year, a Texas-based company says an explosion on a Mexican oil platform off the Louisiana coast was caused by unsafe welding practices. This report followed not one, but four lawsuits against the company asking for $20 million each in actual damages, plus a total of $100 million in punitive damages*. Safety concerns such as these could be reduced with the introduction of a Xiris Weld Camera. Let us help you prioritize safety and efficiency.

 
The XVC-O comes in both a standard and advanced system, and can be easily integrated into a manufacturing line, or the classroom. To learn more about our products and services please visit our website www.xiris.com or contact our sales team directly at sales@xiris.com.

 *This information was collected from the following article: http://www.nola.com/traffic/index.ssf/2013/08/consultantprivate_report_says.html

Topics: weld camera, Welding Process, Sub Arc welding, camera, weld allignment, arc welding, accident

Welding Smoke: How Does it Effect You?

Posted by Leanne Sinclair on Tuesday, August 19, 2014 @ 06:09 PM

The welding environment has very dangerous elements; one that has been scrutinized recently is welding smoke. Although there is an abundance of protective equipment and proactive measures taken, there are still some very hazardous exposures that can occur.

According to the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), welding smoke is a “mixture of very fine particles (fumes) and gases”. This is a known fact of the trade, and every employee and professional knows the risk one accepts when they weld. However, as more long term studies are completed, there are some seemingly minor details that can contribute to very serious health conditions caused by welding. Most fumes and smoke is produced when using arc welding, due to the high heat involved.

smoke1 resized 600

Welding fumes and gases form from the base or filter material, any coatings present, shielding gases, any contaminants in the air, and chemical reactions from arc ultraviolet light and heat. However, these are all very important elements that must be monitored not only for the quality of the weld, but the safety of the employee.

There has been a large amount of studies concerning welding and its relation to Parkinson’s disease. This is a neurological disorder that damages brain cells in the midbrain. These studies have analyzed environmental factors that could be the cause, and have determined that welders develop Parkinson’s at a higher rate than others. This elevated rate has been related to a direct exposure to manganese welding fumes but no definitive results have been found.

With the addition of a welding camera, such injuries and health concerns can be avoided. Welding cameras, such as the XVC-O promote weld efficiency, quality products, as well as the safety of all employees and operators.

To read more about these health concerns and studies follow this link.

To learn more about the efficiency of weld cameras and the numerous benefits please visit our website.

www.xiris.com

Topics: welding, safety, camera, smoke, health, arc welding, parkinsons

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