The Xiris Blog

Labelling Your Weld Videos with Production Weld Data

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, May 06, 2014 @ 04:06 PM

A Weld Camera used for remotely viewing welding processes can become an even more powerful in-line monitoring tool with the addition of real-time annotation of production data into the recorded video.  

When connected to a welding power supply, a Weld Camera system such as the Xiris XVC-O can acquire production data and write it to the exact video frames when it is acquired.  By synchronizing the writing of the actual weld power supply data to the video frame with the physical image of what is happening with the weld, operating personnel are able to perform more detailed analyses of recorded welding parameters during welding or after the weld is completed.

Annotating Weld Videos

 

The integrity of every weld can be ensured when the weld video is recorded with annotated data, such as the following:

  • Weld power profiles (welding voltage, current, conductance)

  • Pulse Mode, Frequency

  • Type of Welding

  • Material

  • Travel Speed

  • Force and displacement profiles

  • Time and Date Stamp

When it is enabled, the XVC-O View Camera can automatically embed a label into the bottom of the recorded video with multiple sets of information sent to it from the welding power supply.  During the welding process, welding anomalies can be seen as they occur to stop and fix the process.  After the weld, any anomaly in the weld process can be reviewed in the recorded video to see exactly at what level the system parameters were set when an observed problem took place.  

The net result is that the operator is able to maximize the amount of information the recorded weld video provides with simultaneous image and data recording.

Benefits:

  • Make more informed quality control decisions.

  • Improve your welding processes by discovering what parameters make good and bad welds.

  • Rapidly determine the optimum power settings to use to get the best quality welds.

  • Troubleshoot set-up problems and machine malfunctions immediately.

  • Provides empirical information matched to a video log about the welding process.

 

Conclusion

If weld quality is of utmost importance, the use of recorded weld videos with labelling helps to ensure your welds are in-process, stable and repeatable.


Topics: remote monitoring, image processing, weld camera, Welding Process, weld video

Monitoring Tube and Pipe Production to Find FORMING Defects

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, April 29, 2014 @ 01:19 PM

Recent advancements in machine vision technology have made a new type of inspection able to see defects related to the forming and welding area of a tube or pipe.  The result is improved quality assurance and process control on the production line.  The new type of inspection device is a laser-based triangulation system that measures the outside contour of a tube or pipe in the vicinity of its weld. 

Typically NDT systems are placed at the end of a production as a final check.  However, the laser inspection system can be placed directly after the weld box.  This system can let operators know what is changing in their welding process, allowing them to perform corrective action before significant scrap occurs. This capacity is especially helpful for one of the most common defects found across all types of Tube manufacturing: Tube Forming Defects, otherwise known as Deflection. 

 

The Deflection Defect

Defection is defined as the overall variance of the tube parent material from an ideal circle.  This defect moves the starting point of all other defects that the Xiris WI2000p measures, up or down. The deflection measurement detects the overall deflection from the ideal circle to the closest tube side within the bead area. The deflection metric is determined by measuring the distance between the sections of the parent material outside of the weld bead width and the ideal profile line. The deflection usually represents the overall offset of the tube walls before welding and is indicative of forming set up or variances in the parent material’s metallurgy.

The drawing below illustrates the defect:

 

 April 29.14 Blog Forming Defect resized 600

The Defection Defect, where “h” = the height of the defect.


How the WI2000p System Measures the Deflection Defect

Xiris Automation Inc. has developed a non-destructive inspection system called the WI2000p Weld Inspection System. The WI2000p  includes  a laser line and a camera whose optical axis is offset to the axis of the laser line by an “offset angle”.  The WI2000p creates a visible cross-section of the tube by projecting the laser line on to the tube and capturing an image of the line using the camera. The resulting image shows a  profile of the tube surface as if it were cut in cross section.  If a tube is ideally round, the laser image will represent a section of an ellipse and any anomaly such as a tube deflection can be mathematically detected. 

The WI2000p bases all of its measurements on the differences between the actual laser profile line seen by the camera, and the ideal mathematical profile based on the tube parameters.  By knowing the position of the actual laser profile, the ideal profile, and the size of the pixels in the image, the WI2000p can detect Deflection profile defects that often escape detection by other quality tools such as Eddy Current testing, or Ultrasonic Testing techniques

 

Conclusion

A new technique for detecting Deflection on welded Tube and Pipe has been developed by Xiris and is known as the WI2000p weld inspection system.  The WI2000p system is a laser based inspection system that is capable of detecting Deflection defects immediately after welding to alert the operator of a defect in time to minimize rejects.  The result is improved quality, fewer field defects and a more reliable method for the operator to optimize the welding process.

 

Resource Library

More source and videos of tube and pipe weld monitoring available at our online library!

Topics: weld inspection, High Dynamic Range, Laser welding, Tube and Pipe welding, image processing, quality control, laser-based monitoring, weld camera, Pipe Cladding, welding defect, forming

Monitoring Tube and Pipe Production to Find BEAD HEIGHT Defects

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 @ 11:01 AM

Recent advancements in machine vision technology have made a new type of inspection able to see defects related to the forming and welding area of a tube or pipe.  The result is improved quality assurance and process control on the production line.  The new type of inspection device is a laser-based triangulation system that measures the outside contour of a tube or pipe in the vicinity of its weld. 

Typically NDT systems are placed at the end of a production as a final check.  However, the laser inspection system can be placed directly after the weld box.  This system can let operators know what is changing in their welding process, allowing them to perform corrective action before significant scrap occurs. This capacity is especially helpful for one of the most common defects found across all types of Tube manufacturing: Tube Bead Height Defects. 

 

The Bead Height Defect (Raised or Sunken Welds)

The material in the bead area may rise on top of the tube parent material surface (known as a “raised weld”) or drop below it (known as a “sunken weld”), depending on the compression force applied, the metallurgy of the material and the welding process parameters.

A sunken weld defect is a visibly significant and quality critical defect that could create weakness in the tube along the bead.  While a raised weld defect may not be considered as an important a defect (as it can be ground off later), it can indicate quality problems in the setup of the welding process.

The bead measurement is defined as the largest absolute value of a raised or sunken weld.  Calculating the bead metric in this way helps to determine the height of the tube material that needs to be ground off to smooth the profile (and restore the cylindrical shape, as required).  In cases where there exists a mismatch defect at the same time, the bead metric will include the mismatch measurement and will report the total loss of the material thickness after grinding.

April 08.14 Blog Bead Height resized 600

The Bead Height Defect, where “h” = the height of the defect.

 

How the WI2000p System Measures the Bead Height Defects

Xiris Automation Inc. has developed a non-destructive inspection system called the WI2000p Weld Inspection System. The WI2000p  includes  a laser line and a camera whose optical axis is offset to the axis of the laser line by an “offset angle”.  The WI2000p creates a visible cross-section of the tube by projecting the laser line on to the tube and capturing an image of the line using the camera. The resulting image shows a  profile of the tube surface as if it were cut in cross section.  If a tube is ideally round, the laser image will represent a section of an ellipse and any anomaly such as Bead Height defects can be mathematically detected. 

The WI2000p bases all of its measurements on the differences between the actual laser profile line seen by the camera, and the ideal mathematical profile based on the tube parameters.  By knowing the position of the actual laser profile, the ideal profile, and the size of the pixels in the image, the WI2000p can detect Bead Height profile defects that often escape detection by other quality tools such as Eddy Current testing, or Ultrasonic Testing techniques

 

Conclusion

A new technique for detecting Bead Height defects on welded Tube and Pipe has been developed by Xiris and is known as the WI2000p weld inspection system.  The WI2000p system is a laser based inspection system that is capable of detecting Bead Height defects immediately after welding to alert the operator of a defect in time to minimize rejects.  The result is improved quality, fewer field defects and a more reliable method for the operator to optimize the welding process.

Topics: weld inspection, High Dynamic Range, Laser welding, Tube and Pipe welding, image processing, quality control, laser-based monitoring, weld camera, Pipe Cladding, welding defect, bead height

Monitoring Tube and Pipe Production to Find UNDERCUT Defects

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 @ 12:10 PM

Recent advancements in machine vision technology have made a new type of inspection able to see defects related to the forming and welding area of a tube or pipe.  The result is improved quality assurance and process control on the production line.  The new type of inspection device is a laser-based triangulation system that measures the outside contour of a tube or pipe in the vicinity of its weld. 

Typically NDT systems are placed at the end of a production as a final check.  However, the laser inspection system can be placed directly after the weld box, This system can let operators know what is changing in their welding process, allowing them to perform corrective action before significant scrap occurs. This capacity is especially helpful for one of the most common defects found mainly in Laser and Plasma welded Tube manufacturing: Weld Bead Undercut. 

 

The Undercut Defect

The undercut defect is primarily a result of laser or plasma welding processes.  It may form if the laser beam or plasma arc is too far off center of the ideal welding zone of the tube material.  Undercut is actually a non-melted, non-welded area of the bead that can occur on one or both sides of the bead.  It looks and behaves like a crack along the bead, creating a very weak point on the tube cross-section.  Undercuts are detected as sharp, narrow negative drops in the actual profile (where at least one side of the undercut must have a high deflection derivative, or near vertical slope) that happen close to the edges of the bead.  The absolute value of the biggest negative drop found is reported as the height of the undercut.

Mar 18.14 Blog Undercut

The Undercut Defect, where “h” = the height of the defect.


How the WI2000p System Measures the Undercut Defect

Xiris Automation Inc. has developed a non-destructive inspection system called the WI2000p Weld Inspection System. The WI2000p  includes  a laser line and a camera whose optical axis is offset to the axis of the laser line by an “offset angle”.  The WI2000p creates a visible cross-section of the tube by projecting the laser line on to the tube and capturing an image of the line using the camera. The resulting image shows a  profile of the tube surface as if it were cut in cross section.  If a tube is ideally round, the laser image will represent a section of an ellipse and any anomaly such as a Undercut can be mathematically detected. 

The WI2000p bases all of its measurements on the differences between the actual laser profile line seen by the camera, and the ideal mathematical profile based on the tube parameters.  By knowing the position of the actual laser profile, the ideal profile, and the size of the pixels in the image, the WI2000p can detect Undercut profile defects that often escape detection by other quality tools such as Eddy Current testing, or Ultrasonic Testing techniques

 

Conclusion

A new technique for detecting Undercut on laser or plasma welded Tube and Pipe has been developed by Xiris and is known as the WI2000p weld inspection system.  The WI2000p system is a laser based inspection system that is capable of detecting Undercut defects immediately after welding to alert the operator of a defect in time to minimize rejects.  The result is improved quality, fewer field defects and a more reliable method for the operator to optimize the welding process.

Topics: weld inspection, High Dynamic Range, Laser welding, Tube and Pipe welding, image processing, quality control, laser-based monitoring, weld camera, Pipe Cladding, welding defect, undercut

How to Remotely View Your Weld Process

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, March 11, 2014 @ 10:06 AM

Ever since the development of automated welding, operators have needed to be able to monitor the welding process to ensure that all parameters are properly adjusted, that the welding head is properly aligned with the weld seam and work pieces, and that the weld pool, weld bead, and other features are all formed correctly. 

For this, fabricators have long relied on operators to directly view the process using welding helmets and protective screens, which contain a dark green filter to remove most of the harmful content of the radiation coming from a welding arc.

However, with recent advances in electronics, cameras such as the Xiris XVC-O Weld Camera have become equipped with High Dynamic Range imaging capability.  Such cameras can capture images from a weld process across a huge range of brightness, including the bright areas of the weld arc and the darker areas of the background areas around the weld.  With such clarity of image, operators are now able to monitor the cameras from afar rather than having to be close to the welding process.

 

There is Remote Imaging……

So, with such camera technology, how remote do the operators want to be to view their weld process?  Imagine some applications such as ship building, nuclear power plants or large pressure vessels where placing an operator near the welding process is both dangerous and difficult.  In such situations, the farther away the operator can be and still monitor the welding process, the better.

Properly designed electronics allow for a robust image to be transmitted from a camera on an automated welding cell to a display up to 40 m (132 ft) away from the camera.  That allows for the operator to be safely removed from the weld process while still being able to see what is going on.

 

Blog 140311 Remote monitoring resized 600 

Monitoring the Weld From Your Desk

 

….And Then There is Really, Really Remote Imaging….

Sometimes an automated welding cell has been installed in a location where all the stakeholders are not able to see it and monitor it.  Production managers, engineers and senior management may all want to occasionally monitor a critical welding process even though they are on the other side of the world! 

Blog 140311 Remote monitoring 2  

How to do it?  Camera cable lengths have their limits!  The solution is to make the camera system IP addressable so that the video images can be visible anywhere an internet connection can be found.  Xiris has implemented IP addressability on certain models of its XVC-O Weld Cameras so that customers can view the welding process very, very remotely!

 

Conclusion

Whether you want to be a short distance away from the welding process, or on the opposite side of the world, there is a way to be able to see what is going on with your welding process as long as you use the right type of camera equipment for monitoring the welding process, such as the Xiris XVC-O Weld Camera system.

  

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com 

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Topics: remote monitoring, welding automation, weld environment, Machine Vision, High Dynamic Range, image processing, quality control, weld camera, Welding Process

Monitoring Tube and Pipe Production to Find MISMATCH Defects

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, March 04, 2014 @ 12:55 PM

Recent advancements in machine vision technology have made a new type of inspection able to see defects related to the forming and welding area of a tube or pipe.  The result is improved quality assurance and process control on the production line.  The new type of inspection device is a laser-based triangulation system that measures the outside contour of a tube or pipe in the vicinity of its weld. 

Typically NDT systems are placed at the end of a production as a final check.  However,  the laser inspection system can be placed directly after the weld box, This system can let operators know what is changing in their welding process, allowing them to perform corrective action before significant scrap occurs. This capacity is especially helpful for one of the most common defects found across all types of Tube manufacturing: Tube Mismatch. 

 

The Mismatch Defect

The Mismatch defect is caused by uneven joining of two edges of the tube material strip before welding. Mismatch is a vital parameter to monitor for all tube and pipe fabricators, regardless of which side is higher. This is because many mills employ a grinder or scarfing process to remove any excess bead that is out of round.  However, if mismatch occurs prior to welding, once the tube bead has been removed, part of the wall on the high side of the mismatch may get removed as well, causing significant thinning of the tube wall or leave a step on the lower side after grinding the weld area.

Sometimes the actual welded tube wall thickness in the area of the bead becomes smaller than the original tube wall thickness. This is a result of processing steps other than material removal, such as corrugation or bending of the tube, which can create additional potential failures if a Mismatch defect is also present.

Mismatch is calculated as the absolute value of the radial difference between the two reference points where the weld bead meets the parent material. The mismatch calculation uses the current roll angle to compensate for the bead roll, as such:

 Blog 140304 students resized 600

 

The Mismatch Defect, where “h” = the height of the defect.

 

How the System Measures the Mismatch Defect

Xiris Automation Inc. has developed a non-destructive inspection system called the WI2000p Weld Inspection System. The WI2000p  includes  a laser line and a camera whose optical axis is offset to the axis of the laser line by an “offset angle”.  The WI2000p creates a visible cross-section of the tube by projecting the laser line on to the tube and capturing an image of the line using the camera. The resulting image shows a  profile of the tube surface as if it were cut in cross section.  If a tube is ideally round, the laser image will represent a section of an ellipse and any anomaly such as a Mismatch can be mathematically detected. 

The WI2000p bases all of its measurements on the differences between the actual laser profile line seen by the camera, and the ideal mathematical profile based on the tube parameters.  By knowing the position of the actual laser profile, the ideal profile, and the size of the pixels in the image, the WI2000p can detect Mismatch profile defects that often escape detection by other quality tools such as Eddy Current testing, or Ultrasonic Testing techniques

 

Conclusion

A new technique for detecting Mismatch on welded Tube and Pipe has been developed by Xiris and is known as the WI2000p weld inspection system.  The WI2000p system is a laser based system that is capable of detecting Mismatch defects immediately after welding to alert the operator of a defect in time to minimize rejects.  The result is improved quality, fewer field defects and a more reliable method for the operator to optimize the welding process.

Topics: weld inspection, High Dynamic Range, Laser welding, Tube and Pipe welding, image processing, quality control, laser-based monitoring, weld camera, Pipe Cladding

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