The Xiris Blog

Edge Detection for Weld Monitoring

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

With the advent of high dynamic range weld cameras, such as the Xiris XVC-1000, images of welding processes can be made with enormous ranges of brightness.  As a result, it is now possible to monitor and record good quality video of most welding processes using an HDR camera.  With good quality images of the weld pool, arc, and seam, the next logical step is to incorporate image processing into the camera system to extract additional information to help operators better control the welding process.

The Edge Detector tool from Xiris is a powerful edge detection and analysis utility that can detect edges, or areas of rapid contrast change, within a region of interest.  When used with a weld camera, the edge detector can help find the size and position of numerous features in a welding scene such as wire width and length, weld seam gap or center, molten pool boundaries or torch tip edge quality.

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Figure 1: Edge Detector window

The Edge Detector generates a projection of intensities from a region of interest into a profile, then analyzes the profile to find presence of edges.  Each edge has a series of properties such as edge strength, expected polarity and location that can be used to measure or sort each edge so that objects in the weld environment can be analyzed.  The net result is a new way for fabricators to enhance the monitoring and controlling of their weld processes.

 Conclusion

By incorporating image processing tools such as an Edge Detector into their weld camera systems, machine builders can measure features of their weld processes in a way that has never before been possible.  It is now possible to find edges in an image, such as the weld wire, or seam, that could allow for further monitoring or analysis, or form the foundation for seam tracking or weld pool geometry analysis.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras and the new Edge Detector tool can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld video, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, R&D, edge detection

Additive Manufacturing Research and Development Made Easier

Posted by Justin Grahn on Wednesday, May 25, 2016 @ 11:38 AM

Additive Manufacturing refers to a process whereby 3D design data is used to build up a component by depositing successive layers of material to create the shape required.  It is also referred to as "3D printing" and can be used to create almost any shape or geometry that is generated from a 3D CAD model.  It is called Additive Manufacturing because material is added together to form a part, distinguished from conventional manufacturing where material is removed to form a part.  

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To form a part, layers of specialized powder or special filament wire can be melted together using a Laser or weld head under a motion system to create the shape required.  This is a fairly new field that is attracting lots of Research and Development to create better processes, powder and wire materials, and bonding techniques.  However, the development process typically requires long run times of the additive manufacturing equipment that is very labor intensive to watch the entire process in real time.

Instead, Xiris Weld Cameras can be used to record the process to produce crisp and clear images of the weld head, laser spot, melt pool and weld bead.  The result is a video of the process in stunning high resolution and clarity, at rates that can exceed 200 frames/sec.  This can allow engineers and scientists to monitor the process live and stop right when an error occurs.  Or, the recorded video can then be played back at a higher speed to allow engineers and scientists to review the process from start to finish and carefully review the events of greatest interest at a lower speed, as required.  This allows the R&D team to focus on the time of defects and errors, by finding out exactly what went wrong with the process by analyzing the recorded video at the time of interest.

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Conclusion

The development effort to improve an additive manufacturing process can be long and tedious.  Using a Weld camera to monitor the process can both help to reduce the labor required to improve the process but also provide better documentation and highlighting of the process variations as they occur.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help with your Additive Manfacturing applications, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld video, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, R&D, LAM, additive manufacturing

Using a Camera for Welding R&D, Part 2: Filler Wire

Posted by Justin Grahn on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 @ 03:09 PM

Most non-Autogenous welding processes use an external filler wire that is added to the process to help fill a large weld gap or provide a wide cladding area. The type of wire, size, metallurgical properties, type of coring, feed speed and angle are just some of the process parameters fabricators want to monitor to ensure their welding process is proven. But how to do it? A number of welding researchers have turned to the Xiris XVC-1000 Weld camera to get better images of their welding process to understand exactly what is happening.

For example, using a Xiris XVC-1000 Weld camera can help researchers monitor key features of any filler wire feeding process:

 

1) Analyze how well the filler wire withstands its feeding process through a variety of welding processes such as high speed travel and side to side weaving processes:Sept_9_High_Speed_wire_feed_causes_an_inconsistent_start_throwing_pieces_of_wire_1.jpg

High speed wire feed causes an inconsistent start, throwing pieces of wire

 

2) Monitor how well the wire is positioned relative to the weld:

Wire feed walking off center

 

 

3) Monitor how well the wire is being fed and if there is any damage to the wire during feeding

Wire damage is clearly evident

 

 

4) Monitor the timing of the wire feeding. This is particularly important during welds of short duration such as laser welding where it is important to analyze the timing of the wire delivery relative to the weld process. In the example shown below, a frame-by-frame analysis was done to observe the timing and interactions between the laser, wire feed, and robot positioning:

The wire touches the plate early

 

The laser turns on at the proper time; the wire feed has not yet started

 

The wire feed finally catches up

 

The wire feed turns off and the head begins to rise with the laser still on

 

The above examples are just some of the areas where a weld camera can be used to help with the process and product development of what type of wire and what parameters to use for specific types of non-autogenous welding.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can augment your R&D processes, visit Xiris.com 

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Topics: weld camera, XVC Weld Camera, R&D

Using a Camera for Welding R&D, Part 1: Powder Spray

Posted by Justin Grahn on Friday, August 21, 2015 @ 01:08 PM

Cladding processes that use powder spray incorporate a variety of technologies such as powder welding, plasma spray, PTA (plasma transferred arc) and laser cladding.  These processes have similar elements where a plasma or laser arc provides the heat source one or more nozzles around the arc that dispense the powder.

Using a Xiris Weld camera can help researchers monitor two key features of any powder spray operation:

  • Monitor the amount of powder that is wasted once it has left the nozzle(s), i.e. how much powder bounces off the weld puddle or work piece without becoming adhered; and
  • Monitor the distribution and flow of powder, during process, to ensure an even & consistent distribution.

Ensure your R&D process is providing you the most information by adding a weld camera!

 Laser Powder Spray Process Development



 

Would you like to see what the Xiris XVC-1000 has to offer?  Subscribe to the Weld Video of the Month Club to receive exclusive video content recorded by our own XVC-1000

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For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com 

Topics: weld camera, XVC Weld Camera, Powder Spray, R&D

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