The Xiris Blog

Detecting Bead Ripple During Tube Manufacturing

Posted by Cameron Serles on Friday, October 05, 2018 @ 11:45 AM

Lighter wall mild steel pipe production requires bead height monitoring for bead ripple. Bead ripple is a condition sometimes associated with a weld process that is too hot and may result in longitudinal weld cracks.  Bead ripples appear along the length of the weld bead as undulations with measurable differences in height by as much as 1/8” (3 mm).  Often the height of the bead ripple on a welded pipe is a function of the heat that has gone into the weld process:  the higher the heat, the greater the height of the bead ripple. In most applications, a weld bead should have a smooth, consistent height as an indicator of a stable weld process.

Bead Ripple1An image of a weld bead with bead ripple

In some applications, a weld bead ripple can be desired, such as in certain coated steel products. This ensures that all contaminants from the area of the weld have been squeezed out, preventing potential inclusions from occurring in the weld bead, which would result in compromised weld quality.

By measuring the bead height on a weld bead over a period of time using a laser based triangulation system , an indication of the smoothness of the weld bead can be made.  By calculating ongoing historical statistics of the head height (e.g. min/max, average, standard deviation), an indication of smoothness of the weld bead or bead ripple can be made.  Tolerances of the amount of smoothness or ripple can be set to match the process and when exceeded, an alarm can be set.

Bead Ripple Detection1 Measuring the weld bead height over successive images can detect bead ripple over time

Topics: tube mill, tubedefects, productivity tools, tube, bead height, Tube and Pipe welding, quality control

Seam Monitoring for Coil Joining

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, September 04, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

Monitoring the welding process during coil joining at the front end of a tube mill is crucial to the integrity of the weld as it moves through the tube mill.  Coil joint failure can be costly in terms of both time and efficiency of production on the mill. Operator safety must also be maintained by removing them from the direct welding area as much as possible while enabling them to monitor the coil joining process.

Continuous welding processes used in coil joining require real time operator monitoring to ensure that the process continues smoothly and efficiently. The Xiris XVC-1100e50 camera provides a way to do just that.

A recent Xiris customer manufactures thick walled steel pipe in a continuous high frequency welding process at 70 feet (20 m) per minute.  The customer had implemented a semi-automatic coil end joining system on the infeed buffer of the pipe mill, giving the operator about 10 minutes to end sheer, mate and weld a new coil. This is sometimes referred to as end joining.

The welding process used a MIG welding torch mounted onto a linear track with dual axis torch position adjustment via a remote control pendant. With the Xiris XVC-1100e50 camera mounted to the traveling torch assembly, the operator was able to close the curtain, providing greater weld arc shielding while maintaining a clear view of the weld torch-to-seam alignment on a display screen.

The camera provided the operator with a clear, close up view of the weld process, which allowed the operator be remote from the direct welding area.  By providing a clearer image of the weld process, the operator was able to make more consistent welds, reducing the potential for a joint failure as the strip is driven through the pipe making process.

For a video of the coil joining process taken by the XVC-1100e50 camera, please view the video below. 

coil joining

This is just one example of how Xiris products can enhance your manufacturing process. Contact Xiris sales to see how our products can enhance your unique process.

 

Topics: tubedefects, Tube and Pipe welding, coil joining, tube mill, mill

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