The Xiris Blog

Watching a 1,000,000 Watt Plasma Arc!

Posted by Justin Grahn on Tuesday, February 27, 2018 @ 01:17 PM

Usually Xiris Weld cameras are used to monitor open weld arcs of many kinds of processes, including plasma welding processes, where the power settings are usually in the range of a few hundred Watts of power.

So imagine when presented with the challenge of monitoring a one million Watt plasma arc! This is exactly what Xiris was asked to do – mount a camera to see such a powerful arc as part of an industrial process. We were not sure how well the camera would respond to the plasma arc as it was so hot and generated such intense bright light that even the dynamic range of the XVC-1000 weld camera may not be sufficient to properly image it.

When setting up the camera, we had to mount the camera far away from the plasma arc, at about 6 ft. (2 m) away, while monitor the entire process in a completely different room. The plasma arc was so powerful that our camera would shake when the arc was activated. Even from a protected room, the noise that the plasma arc generated seemed like standing next to a jet engine.

We were happy to discover that, even with such a powerful light source, the Xiris XVC-1000 weld camera was able to capture clear images of the high-powered plasma arc. The images were good enough to see sufficient detail in the arc for research staff to analyze the behavior of the return arc remotely, without having to be close enough to the plasma source to create hazardous work conditions.

2018_2_27 - Watching a 1,000,000 Watt Plasma Arc

An Actual Image of a 1,000,000 Watt Plasma Arc!


Topics: weld camera, weld monitoring, Plasma

Xiris is Growing!

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, February 13, 2018 @ 11:33 AM

In 2017 Xiris saw business growth of more than 40% over the previous year. This growth was due in part to the large increase in automation throughout the manufacturing industry, an increase in metal additive manufacturing in the aerospace industry and a new focus on employee training, health and safety for welding processes.

North American Industry saw the highest number of robots delivered in 2017, with twenty-seven thousand delivered in the first nine months, according to Machine Design magazine. The largest installations of robots came from the automotive components and metals manufacturing markets with food and consumer goods close behind. The machine vision market also saw a growth rate of 14% in 2017 with 14% of those being vision systems.

The Xiris XVC family of weld cameras have become critical tools in advancing weld automation processes across the board, particularly in the growing markets mentioned above. The Xiris weld cameras become the eyes of the robot and enable operators to safely see the weld process from start to finish.

In order to keep up with this growth, Xiris is also expanding. We have added a number of new employees in all areas of the company. We now have a Sales Manager in Dusseldorf to address increased demand in Europe. We have also increased staff at our head office in Burlington in all areas of the business including software/hardware design and development, production and product support. With these added resources we feel well positioned to meet growing demands and look forward to continued growth and success in 2018 and the coming years.

Thank you to all our great customers and partners for a great 2017!

Xiris personnel.jpg


Topics: weld camera, welding automation, Machine Vision, Robotic Welding

Video: The solar eclipse seen through a weld camera!

Posted by Mike Lundy on Thursday, August 31, 2017 @ 01:02 PM

The day of the recent solar eclipse was a fun one for us at Xiris. It was also a chance to show off the High Dynamic Range (HDR) capabilities of our weld cameras.

Xiris Weld Camera.jpg

One of the great advantages of state-of-the-art HDR cameras is their ability to capture both the super-bright light produced by a weld torch and the important detail in the surrounding dark background, and we realized that capability would give us an excellent view of the eclipse. All we had to do was take a camera out of the box and aim it—no special filters needed to view the breathtaking sight.


We set up outside of our office and started watching high-contrast images (about 140 dB of signal range) of the event on a monitor hooked up to our XVC-1100 camera. We all enjoyed the show, and before long, so were folks from surrounding offices, who made their way over to view with us. We even had the pleasure of a visit from Pam Damoff, a Member of Parliament from the Oakville North - Burlington district, who appreciated the chance to see what a Xiris camera can do.


It was a perfect opportunity to illustrate the power of High Dynamic Range imaging. It was also a nice break from the normal office routine!

To see for yourself how we set up and the high level of light/dark contrast we were able to capture, take a look at this short video.


Topics: weld camera, High Dynamic Range

Checking Tube Welds Before and After Scarfing

Posted by Cameron Serles on Wednesday, December 07, 2016 @ 10:01 AM


The process of tube welding requires several variables to be in check for efficient and stable production and to meet the quality demands of the industry.  Mill dynamics, from setup to production, have an impact on the stability of these variables.  Measuring and monitoring these variables is the first step in controlling them and improving weld quality for tube fabricators.

In response, tube fabricators employ laser based weld inspection systems to monitor a variety of geometrical features around the weld area of the tube and to provide early warning of quality issues related to the welding and forming process.  Traditionally placed right after the weld box on a tube mill, where the majority of tube forming and weld bead measurements can be made, such systems provide the operator with an early warning of weld related process variations that could lead to quality defects.  

While most tube mill customers use the system right after the weld box where the most as-weld related information is available, some fabricators use it after scarfing to check for quality issues related to the scarfing process: does the scarfing tool cut too deeply, or not enough?  Is the tool damaged?  Is the scarf cut a consistent amount?  All these questions can be addressed by installing a weld system after scarfing.

Now, Xiris has developed a double head laser based weld inspection system that allows for one head to be placed immediately after the weld box and one head immediately after scarfing.  In this way, tube fabricators can monitor their tube production before scarfing for weld related defects; and after scarfing for potential scarf related issues.


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WI2000 Double Head Configuration: One Head Post Weld, One Head Post Scarf

 With a double head configuration, tube fabricators can better control their process and improve quality by monitoring the tube profile, weld bead geometry and final scarf cut, all controlled from a single system. 


For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit or sign up to receive the Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: quality control, weld camera, weld inspection, Xiris, Tube and Pipe welding, scarfing, weld seam

Xiris Attends CanWeld 2016

Posted by Catherine Cline on Wednesday, October 12, 2016 @ 09:14 AM

Xiris had the pleasure of co-exhibiting with Maverick Testing and TIP TIG USA at the CanWeld Tradeshow and Conference, held at the Expo Centre in Edmonton Alberta, Oct. 5-6, 2016.   The conference was well attended and drew from a wide range of industry, including mining, oil and gas, pipelines, power generation, petrochemical, fabrication and construction, manufacturing, steel and shipbuilding and pulp and paper.  Educators were also out in full force including attendees from Red Deer College, Thompson River University, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) and Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT).   All were very enthusiastic about the Xiris weld videos on display at the booth citing the unbelievable image clarity Xiris is able to achieve with its high dynamic range weld cameras.Blog_Oct_12_Image_1.jpg

The Maverick and TipTig Booths at CanWeld with “TEX” Front and Centre.

Maverick Testing, with locations in La Porte, Texas and Corpus Christi, Texas, is a full spectrum, state-of-the-art testing laboratory providing a comprehensive range of metallurgical and mechanical testing services as well as Welding Procedure Specification development.  Maverick was exhibiting its welder test coupons which are used in house for its Welding Process Qualifications but are also available to be purchased and shipped to other facilities or jobsites.  Visit

TIP TIG offers a very unique hotwire GTAW welding process that uses patented wire feed technology to provide the highest quality, highest deposition rates with the lowest possible heat input values, while consistently delivering the greatest metallurgical results on all alloys.  The process has also been proven to provide the lowest possible hexavalent chrome weld fume emissions which have been measured as “undetectable”.  The TIP TIG technology can be used successfully on a number of alloys including; Carbon, Duplex and Super Duplex Stainless Steels, Inconel, Stellite, Titanium, Aluminum, Hastelloy and many others.  Visit for more information.

Xiris was also fortunate to be able to integrate our cameras into the orbital welding system at the Lincoln Electric booth.   The welders were extremely impressed by the camera system and found it far easier to weld looking at a clear picture on the computer screen versus the view through a weld helmet!


The Xiris XVC-1000 integrated into the Lincoln Orbital Welder.


Next, Xiris looks forward to Fabtech 2016 in Las Vegas, November 16-18 where both Lincoln and TIP TIG (as well as many others) will be welding with Xiris Cameras.  Check future blogs for details.  We look forward to seeing you there!


Join us at Fabtech Booth N6036Blog_Oct_12_Image_3.jpg

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit 

Topics: weld camera, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, fabtech, Maverick Testing, CanWeld 2016, Tip Tig, Lincoln Electric

Using Weld Cameras For Torch Alignment

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 @ 11:09 AM

When Xiris demonstrates its weld camera systems, one of the unexpected benefits an operator notices right away is the ability to quickly align the torch and seam.   Xiris weld cameras have integrated LED’s that provide a nice bright image of the seam and torch prior to starting the weld process.  Before we begin our demonstration, we ask the operator to align the torch and the seam which is usually done manually with a visual check.  Once we are told the system is aligned, we ask the operator to look at the computer screen and, 90% of the time, the torch and seam are misaligned.  The operator then begins to use the weld camera system right away to achieve perfect alignment on a consistent basis.

Here are three videos that demonstrate the alignment process.  In these examples the manufacturer has installed a positioning sensor on the robotic arm which is meant to ensure perfect torch alignment during each weld and the operator simply verifies the alignment prior to welding.

Operator Alignment:

The positioning sensor and the operator have misaligned the torch, resulting in a bad weld.



Weld Camera Assisted Alignment:

The operator has used the weld camera system to verify the alignment and you will see the adjustments that were made after the robot had been aligned.  Not only do the cameras ensure accuracy, the operator can perform the alignment quickly, right from the console rather than bending, stretching or climbing up on to the equipment to achieve proper alignment.












For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can ensure accurate alignment of your torch and weld seam, visit

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, High Dynamic Range, productivity, color weld camera, weld seam, weld seam alignment

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