The Xiris Blog

Checking Tube Welds Before and After Scarfing

Posted by Cameron Serles on Wednesday, December 07, 2016 @ 10:01 AM

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The process of tube welding requires several variables to be in check for efficient and stable production and to meet the quality demands of the industry.  Mill dynamics, from setup to production, have an impact on the stability of these variables.  Measuring and monitoring these variables is the first step in controlling them and improving weld quality for tube fabricators.

In response, tube fabricators employ laser based weld inspection systems to monitor a variety of geometrical features around the weld area of the tube and to provide early warning of quality issues related to the welding and forming process.  Traditionally placed right after the weld box on a tube mill, where the majority of tube forming and weld bead measurements can be made, such systems provide the operator with an early warning of weld related process variations that could lead to quality defects.  

While most tube mill customers use the system right after the weld box where the most as-weld related information is available, some fabricators use it after scarfing to check for quality issues related to the scarfing process: does the scarfing tool cut too deeply, or not enough?  Is the tool damaged?  Is the scarf cut a consistent amount?  All these questions can be addressed by installing a weld system after scarfing.

Now, Xiris has developed a double head laser based weld inspection system that allows for one head to be placed immediately after the weld box and one head immediately after scarfing.  In this way, tube fabricators can monitor their tube production before scarfing for weld related defects; and after scarfing for potential scarf related issues.

 

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WI2000 Double Head Configuration: One Head Post Weld, One Head Post Scarf

 With a double head configuration, tube fabricators can better control their process and improve quality by monitoring the tube profile, weld bead geometry and final scarf cut, all controlled from a single system. 

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com or sign up to receive the Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: quality control, weld camera, weld inspection, Xiris, Tube and Pipe welding, scarfing, weld seam

Xiris Attends CanWeld 2016

Posted by Catherine Cline on Wednesday, October 12, 2016 @ 09:14 AM

Xiris had the pleasure of co-exhibiting with Maverick Testing and TIP TIG USA at the CanWeld Tradeshow and Conference, held at the Expo Centre in Edmonton Alberta, Oct. 5-6, 2016.   The conference was well attended and drew from a wide range of industry, including mining, oil and gas, pipelines, power generation, petrochemical, fabrication and construction, manufacturing, steel and shipbuilding and pulp and paper.  Educators were also out in full force including attendees from Red Deer College, Thompson River University, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT) and Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT).   All were very enthusiastic about the Xiris weld videos on display at the booth citing the unbelievable image clarity Xiris is able to achieve with its high dynamic range weld cameras.Blog_Oct_12_Image_1.jpg

The Maverick and TipTig Booths at CanWeld with “TEX” Front and Centre.

Maverick Testing, with locations in La Porte, Texas and Corpus Christi, Texas, is a full spectrum, state-of-the-art testing laboratory providing a comprehensive range of metallurgical and mechanical testing services as well as Welding Procedure Specification development.  Maverick was exhibiting its welder test coupons which are used in house for its Welding Process Qualifications but are also available to be purchased and shipped to other facilities or jobsites.  Visit coupons@mavtechinc.com

TIP TIG offers a very unique hotwire GTAW welding process that uses patented wire feed technology to provide the highest quality, highest deposition rates with the lowest possible heat input values, while consistently delivering the greatest metallurgical results on all alloys.  The process has also been proven to provide the lowest possible hexavalent chrome weld fume emissions which have been measured as “undetectable”.  The TIP TIG technology can be used successfully on a number of alloys including; Carbon, Duplex and Super Duplex Stainless Steels, Inconel, Stellite, Titanium, Aluminum, Hastelloy and many others.  Visit www.tiptigusa.com for more information.

Xiris was also fortunate to be able to integrate our cameras into the orbital welding system at the Lincoln Electric booth.   The welders were extremely impressed by the camera system and found it far easier to weld looking at a clear picture on the computer screen versus the view through a weld helmet!

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The Xiris XVC-1000 integrated into the Lincoln Orbital Welder.

 

Next, Xiris looks forward to Fabtech 2016 in Las Vegas, November 16-18 where both Lincoln and TIP TIG (as well as many others) will be welding with Xiris Cameras.  Check future blogs for details.  We look forward to seeing you there!

 

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For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com 

Topics: weld camera, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, fabtech, Maverick Testing, CanWeld 2016, Tip Tig, Lincoln Electric

Using Weld Cameras For Torch Alignment

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 @ 11:09 AM

When Xiris demonstrates its weld camera systems, one of the unexpected benefits an operator notices right away is the ability to quickly align the torch and seam.   Xiris weld cameras have integrated LED’s that provide a nice bright image of the seam and torch prior to starting the weld process.  Before we begin our demonstration, we ask the operator to align the torch and the seam which is usually done manually with a visual check.  Once we are told the system is aligned, we ask the operator to look at the computer screen and, 90% of the time, the torch and seam are misaligned.  The operator then begins to use the weld camera system right away to achieve perfect alignment on a consistent basis.

Here are three videos that demonstrate the alignment process.  In these examples the manufacturer has installed a positioning sensor on the robotic arm which is meant to ensure perfect torch alignment during each weld and the operator simply verifies the alignment prior to welding.

Operator Alignment:

The positioning sensor and the operator have misaligned the torch, resulting in a bad weld.

 

 

Weld Camera Assisted Alignment:

The operator has used the weld camera system to verify the alignment and you will see the adjustments that were made after the robot had been aligned.  Not only do the cameras ensure accuracy, the operator can perform the alignment quickly, right from the console rather than bending, stretching or climbing up on to the equipment to achieve proper alignment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can ensure accurate alignment of your torch and weld seam, visit Xiris.com

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, High Dynamic Range, productivity, color weld camera, weld seam, weld seam alignment

Using a Light Meter for Automatic Weld Monitoring

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, August 02, 2016 @ 02:30 AM

With the advent of high dynamic range weld cameras such as the Xiris XVC-1000, images of welding processes can be made with enormous ranges of brightness.  As a result, it is now possible to monitor and record good quality video of most welding processes using an HDR camera.  With good quality images of the weld pool, arc and seam, the next logical step is to incorporate image processing into the camera system to extract additional information to help operators better control the welding process.

One of the most basic tools for image processing is a LightMeter.  The LightMeter tool from Xiris provides statistical information about the pixel values in an area of interest.  It can be used as an overall measure of the intensity of a weld process, detect part or feature presence, or be the first step in performing powerful image processing on an area of interest.

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Figure 1 : LightMeter Window

The LightMeter generates a histogram based on the light intensities of the pixels in an area of interest, calculating a number of statistics, including:

Median – the brightness level that separates all the pixels in the area of interest into two equal halves.

Mean - the average brightness of all the pixels in the area of interest

Mode - the pixel brightness level that appears most often in the area of interest.

Minimum - the value of the darkest pixel in the area of interest.

Dark Tail – the pixel value at which a specific percentage of the total number of pixels in an area of interest are found to be darker.

Bright Tail - the pixel value at which a specific percentage of the total number of pixels in an area of interest are found to be brighter. 

Maximum – the value of the brightest pixel in the area of interest.

Standard Deviation – the amount of variation or dispersion of brightness levels of all the pixels in an area of interest.

Sum – the addition of all the pixel values in the area of interest.

These measurements can be used as building blocks by users and developers to create automatic inspection algorithms to measure welding features and parameters with the goal of performing a level of process or quality assurance.

A sample histogram with some of the key features is displayed below:

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Figure 2: Sample Histogram

Conclusion:

By incorporating image processing tools such as a LightMeter tool into their weld camera systems, machine builders can measure features of their weld processes in a way that has never before been possible.  It is now possible to find and measures levels of light across an entire image, or in a region of interest in an image.  This can provide information about features of the weld, such as the weld wire, melt pool or weld seam, that could allow for further monitoring or analysis, or form the foundation for seam tracking or weld pool geometry analysis.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras and the LightMeter image processing tool can enhance the quaity and economy of your welding processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld camera, image processing, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, area of interest

Weld Revolution Uses the Xiris Color Weld Camera

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, July 05, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

 

 

Last week Xiris Automation was given the opportunity to work with the team at Weld Revolution and record some footage with the new XVC-1100 color camera.   

Weld Revolution’s SpinArc® welding torches utilize a high speed rotating weld arc to enable the welding of all metals in any position using either metal-cored or solid wires in spray transfer or pulse modes.  

The unique stirring action delivers clean robust welds and is extremely effective for narrow groove welding.  The above video, captured with the XVC-1100 color weld camera, shows how smooth and consistent the SpinArc® process welds as it travels down a 3” deep groove and as a result, the weld bead typically requires little or no beveling.

Even with the incredible brightness of the arc and the outer walls of the narrow groove, the XVC-1100 colour camera was able to automatically adjust and deliver an excellent picture with detail of the melt pool, side wall tie-in, alignment, heat effected zone, and even wire spin.

   
For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help with your Orbital Welding applications, visit Xiris.com

Sign up to receive our Weld Video of the Month

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, High Dynamic Range, weld pool, productivity, color weld camera

Xiris Will Exhibit at the Beijing Essen Welding & Cutting Fair

Posted by Cameron Serles on Wednesday, June 08, 2016 @ 10:47 AM

 

Xiris Automation has a successfully established presence in China.  Since 2014, we have sold a significant number of our weld camera systems to Chinese End users and welding machine builders.  To continue expanding our business in China, Xiris will exhibit at:

The 2016 Beijing Essen Welding and Cutting Fair

June 14 – 17, in Beijing

The Beijing Essen Welding and Cutting Fair is one of the world’s leading welding exhibitions and the largest and the most influential welding trade fair held in China every year.  In 2015 the fair had almost 24,000 visitors attending from 50 countries, and almost 1,000 exhibitors from 28 countries.  Anticipating an even bigger show this year, Xiris expects to be very busy!

Come visit us at Booth # W2521, Hall W2

We will be demonstrating the XVC-1000, XVC-1100, and XVC-1000e weld cameras for Open Arc welding.  Using leading-edge technology, our open arc weld cameras combine a spectacular 140+ dB High Dynamic Range imaging capability with power over Ethernet, a full suite of welding-specific imaging software tools, and a host of unique features to provide unprecedented image quality of a variety of welding and laser processes. The camera allows the operator to remotely view the weld arc and its immediate environment up to 100 m away.  The camera comes packed with functionality designed to maximize image quality and reliability, including image triggering, general purpose I/O, image windowing capability, and a weld arc photodetector.

We are looking forward to the show and hope you will stop by to see what our weld cameras can do for you!

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For more information about The Beijing Essen Weld Show, click here

Topics: weld camera, weld video, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, Beijing Essen 2016