The Xiris Blog

Xiris Automation: Let Our Customers Do the Talking!

Posted by Margaret Montgomery on Thursday, September 13, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

Our weld camera and tube & pipe inspection systems are only part of the solution we provide to our customers. 

Xiris Automation also had an exceptional service team which supports the integration of our products into several different processes and applications around the world. 

Not only is our service team available to answer questions about product functionality, system operation and integration, but they have also proven to be crucial when helping in situations when cameras or equipment are damaged during the manufacturing process and require a quick repair. One customer recently recounted an incident "when a series of events on-and off-shift led to improper re-assembly of a damaged camera cable", and:

"Xiris' service team proved to be as exceptional in their response as their equipment has been in its welding process role."

                   - Brian Dobben, Flowserve Corporation

You can read Brian's blog on valuable new technologies in arc vision for welding here.

As Brian says, Xiris' technical support team travels worldwide to help customers onsite with installation and training issues after they have purchased a product from Xiris directly, in order to help make the application of our products smooth and painless. Our technical support team often deals with cases that are unique to the customers' particular welding environment, answering any inquiries often the same day of the inquiry, when received during regular working hours. When a service request comes in, Xiris employees simulate the customer's issue on in-house equipment, answering questions about how to set up the equipment to get the best view of the welding process. 

tech support

A Xiris tech support employee working on an industrial computer.

In short, Xiris Automation not only provides innovative products for the fabricating and steel production industries, it also backs up those products with a team of experienced service professionals who are determined to make every customer satisfied with their user experience!

 

Topics: weld camera system, color weld camera, productivity, Tube and Pipe welding

Using High Dynamic Range Cameras for Slip-Ring Applications

Posted by Cameron Serles on Thursday, August 16, 2018 @ 12:00 PM

If you use slip rings and rotating torches in cladding, there now is a way that you can see the welding process much more clearly than ever before.

Xiris has successfully tested our XVC-1000 and XVC-1000e weld cameras on rotating welding machines using slip rings—and the cameras work perfectly!  Unlike other cameras with electrical noise interferences, the Xiris Weld Cameras are not affected by the electrical noise and interferences common with running video over a slip ring.

Even Over a Slip Ring Connection, Xiris Weld Camera Maintains a Noise Free Image

Slip rings are electromechanical devices that are designed to pass electrical signals from a rotary source (such as a weld camera mounted next to one or more torches that rotate around the inside of a part) to a stationary receiver (such as a computer which receives the video data from the cameras). They are devices that allow for the transmission of an electrical signal and power.  By employing a metal brush that rubs against a rotating metal ring, the video signal coming from the camera travels through the connection, avoiding the use of solid cables that could potentially twist indefinitely until damaged.

Weld cameras are making their way into a variety of cladding operations.  However, it is very difficult to monitor cladding on the inside of the pipe, especially when the pipe stays stationary and the torch rotates.  This can be a problem for a standard connection: as the torch rotates continuously, cables cannot withstand very many rotations before they break.  Therefore, the use of slip rings would be a natural solution.  However, slip rings typically are used for motor signals and power, applications that are a little more tolerant of electrical noise than video signals.  Typical industrial cameras haven’t worked well with slip rings because their analog signals are not resistant to electrical noise.

The problem is that cladding is typically done using a TIG welding process, which is notorious for generating lots of electrical noise that can kill standard electronics due to its high-frequency starts.

But the Xiris weld cameras don’t die or short-circuit from high-frequency welding noise, even with a slip ring.  Our cameras and the welding machine keep working together when used with a slip ring—allowing operators to remotely see high dynamic range (HDR) images of their cladding process, in real time, on a computer screen, remotely.  The Xiris weld cameras with HDR capability permit operators to see both the super-bright weld arc and its dark surrounding background, with no need to stop the process.

We’ve tested our HDR weld cameras on slip-ring applications numerous times, and the advanced electronics in the cameras have repeatedly been up to the task. We’d be glad to demonstrate on your set-up.

This is new technology, but it’s ready now to improve the efficiency of your rotating-torch cladding.

Topics: weld camera system, cladding, Pipe Cladding, pipe, Slip Ring, TIG, TIG welding, tig torch

An Eye Into the Future: Weld Cameras in the Classroom

Posted by Margaret Montgomery on Thursday, July 19, 2018 @ 10:00 AM

Xiris's XVC-1100 kit and XVC-1000e HDR weld cameras are transforming the way aspiring weld operators are taught. 

Xiris Cameras an Asset in the Classroom

The XVC-1100 weld camera kit, which is being used at the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT), enables students and instructors alike to capture and save videos of their welds. During instruction, the XVC-1100 allows students to see what the instructor is doing on a large, projected screen- rather than having to crowd around the instructor performing the weld. During practical work, students are able to perform a weld and save the recorded video so that they can review their weld and technique after they are finished.

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The Xiris XVC-1100 camera installation at SAIT Polytechnic enables students to film and review their welds.

The XVC-1000e weld camera is being used at Santa Anna College. The camera is mounted directly on a weld robot, similar to how welding occurs in many manufacturing environments today-thereby providing students with correct training in the welding techniques they'll use in the workplace once they graduate.  

The XVC-1100 and XVC-1000e cameras both feature adjustable optics. With a tightly focused view, students can see the interaction taking place between the wire fed metal and the parent material as well as a clear view of the weld arc and the resulting melt pool. When the camera is configured with a larger view of the welding process and its coupon, the student can see all the motion during the weld process so they can learn the hand and torch positioning techniques from the instructor. 

Both types of cameras allow welding instructors to demonstrate to their students good and bad welds- and what determines the difference between a good and bad weld.

As weld cameras increasingly become a standard tool in welding processes of all types, their use in welding education is becoming an important step in the training of the next generation of welders. Not only do the cameras help students learn the basics of welding, bringing cameras into the classroom provides another way for students to learn welding adopt new technologies in their future professions. 

This is why the use of the Xiris Weld Cameras in instructional settings will continue to grow.

Our XVC Evaluation Kit for educators includes everything instructors need to record and playback their welding processes, including cables, an assortment of lenses, and more. 

If you are interested in learning more about our company and products or using our weld cameras, please contact us here.

Topics: weld camera system, weld camera, welding education, welding course

DED Additive Manufacturing: 5 Things You Can Monitor With A Weld Camera

Posted by Cameron Serles on Thursday, July 05, 2018 @ 12:00 PM

Of greatest interest to most users of Additive Manufacturing using Direct Energy Depostion (DED) processes is the ability to constantly monitor the deposition process and to stop the process if the deposition goes awry. DED power sources generate a lot of light which is difficult to properly image using a traditional camera.  By using a Xiris Weld Camera placed around the DED head to monitor the DED process, an operator can stop the deposition process and repair the defective region then resume the deposition without adding additional material on top of the defective area. 

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 A detailed image of the Additive Manufacturing process, captured by a Xiris Weld Camera.

With a Xiris Weld Camera, the bright light arc from the DED power source can be clearly seen as well as the detail of its immediate surrounding environment.  Here are 5 areas where the operator is able to see more details of the additive process with such a camera:

  1. Amount of shielding gas being used (Plasma or TIG)

With a clear view of the arc used to melt the fed powder or wire, operators can monitor how much shielding gas is being used and whether adjustments are needed

  1. Alignment of weld torch to previous layer

With a clear view of the previous pass of material, the operator can make sure that the DED head is tracking the layer properly.

  1. Keyhole spot size, location and shape (Laser)

All features of the molten material being deposited can be better monitored with a clearer view of the weld environment.

  1. The powder or wire being deposited,

With a clear view of the arc used to melt the fed powder or wire, operators can monitor how much shielding gas is being used and whether adjustments are needed

  1. The quality of the resulting melt pool and formed final bead.

Looking for dross, good quality melting and proper wetting in the melt pool and proper final bead shape one the bead has cooled is possible with a weld camera as the operator can see enough detail for these features to be visible.

 

Summary

By adding a Xiris weld camera to a DED process, operators can ensure that their parts quality is optimized during production and expensive rework is avoided.

 

Topics: weld camera system, color weld camera, additive manufacturing

Xiris at the 2018 Beijing Essen Welding and Cutting Show

Posted by Dean Zhao on Thursday, June 07, 2018 @ 12:00 PM

Discovering New Opportunities Alongside our Chinese Distributors

The Beijing Essen Welding & Cutting Fair is among the leading welding exhibitions, attracting many professionals in different sectors of the welding industry. It was an excellent opportunity for us to work alongside our Chinese distributors Harbin Jinlifeng Science and Technology Development Co. Ltd and Belwin Intelligent Technology Co. They continue to help us expand our presence in the area, and have our products applied in new ways.

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Representatives from Harbin Jinlifeng Science and Technology Development Co. and Belwin Intelligent Technology Co. with Xiris President Cameron Serles

Our cameras were on display for visitors, along with footage from our XVC product line. If you wish to have our cameras on display at your booth to highlight your products and equipment in live demonstrations, or are interested in learning more about our company and products, please contact us here.

Topics: Trade Show, weld camera system, Beijing Essen 2018

Weld Safety: Before and After

Posted by Margaret Montgomery on Friday, May 18, 2018 @ 01:37 PM

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, welders and cutters "have one of the highest rates of injuries of all occupations." [1] 

safety before+ after larger

Before installing a weld camera, welders are often perched at unsafe heights, giving them a poor view of their welding activities. 

Welders Work in Precarious Positions

Many welding activities are done at unsafe heights, while the welder attempts to monitor and control the welding process. The moving machinery around them forces them to work in small, constrained working areas- which is often dangerous and uncomfortable for the operator. In these conditions- behind a helmet and perched above the welding process- welders miss important details in the welding arc, which can lead to mistakes and inaccuracies that are costly and timely to fix. Not only are these conditions a safety risk, but they make it harder for welders to ensure that they execute a high quality weld.

Weld Cameras Give Welders an Eye Into Detail

Xiris Automation weld cameras enable workers to perform a weld without leaving the ground. Our solutions give welders a consistent image quality regardless of the angle of the weld. They can view multiple images of the weld from leading, trailing or side views of the weld process. 

 

Don't pay for accidents, prevent them using machine vision technology. 

 

If you are interested in learning more about our company and products, please contact us here.

 

[1]“Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers.” U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 13 Apr. 2018, www.bls.gov/ooh/production/welders-cutters-solderers-and-brazers.htm#tab-3.

Topics: weld camera system, weld camera, arc welding, mig welding, weld safety

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