The Xiris Blog

Why You Should Use a CellView Camera

Posted by Greg Cooke on Thursday, June 27, 2019 @ 12:45 PM

Welding automation is becoming increasingly more common and necessary to ensure high-quality welds and productivity. Using weld cameras, such as the Xiris CellView camera, helps operators see the welding process more clearly and helps them make any in-process adjustments. 

CellView cameras enable operators to view a weld cell from a broader perspective, they see the bigger picture of the welding process. This allows the operator to ensure the related equipment and area are clear and working properly. Since the operator can view the weld cell from a monitor with a CellView camera, the operator can work in safer conditions further away from any dangerous welding process. With the additional visibility from utilizing the CellView camera system along with other weld cameras, operators and supervisors can increase the “arc-on time” (time spent welding) by reducing the amount of time needed for set-up, or to make adjustments to the welding process while in operation.

 

Diagram of how a CellView camera would be set-up with another weld camera. 

CellView Camera System

CellView Camera BenefitsThe Xiris CellView camera is a robust adjustable color camera with a wide-angle view with motorized zoom. It is typically installed with the XVC-1000e weld camera for maximum results. As the CellView camera is integrated with the Xiris camera system, it can be managed and monitored from the same HMI. Coarse adjustments can also be made utilizing the larger view and the Xiris weld camera for the final setup. Xiris cameras can be located up to 100 meters away without loss of image quality making the monitoring of very large automation cells or multiple cells from a control room possible, and the addition of more cameras and views easy.

 

For more information contact us or request a free, one-on-one, no obligation consultation!

 

Better Images. Better Decisions. Better Process Control.

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Topics: quality control, weld environment, safety, health, weld camera system, wide-angle, CellView camera, welding cell

10 Reasons Why You Should Add a Weld Camera to Your Classroom

Posted by Cameron Serles on Thursday, May 30, 2019 @ 01:00 PM

Adding cameras to view and recording welding is a constant desire of progressive welding schools. However, for many years, there was a lack of the appropriate camera technology with High Dynamic Range imaging capability to properly image welding and display it on a standard 8-bit monitor. The Xiris Weld Camera has overcome this with a combination of advanced electronics and software that map the output to a computer monitor for best viewing results, presenting 10 compelling reasons why Instructors should add a weld camera to their program:

  1. A more-enjoyable, “high-tech” learning experience. By introducing cameras into your training curriculum, students will appreciate the modern approach to training an old skill. The result - enhanced prestige for your weld training facility.
  2. Use of recorded welding videos in the classroom. The ability to repeatedly view, and learn from, recorded demonstrations of good and bad welds can improve the overall effectiveness of your learning program.  Imagine having an ongoing source of video material for multiple classroom discussions, or to recreate lessons of key concepts.
  3. A clear view of all the features of the weld process. Never again worry during welding instruction that all students can see what is being taught.  A camera output to a large display makes all the features of a weld visible to everyone in your class.
  4. Better use of classroom layout. No more worry about classroom space, how many students can fit around a particular weld demonstration and how close they can be to the demonstration.
  5. Better capability to demonstrate new or subtle welding techniques. By building up a library of various techniques, students could review the videos of the best or newest welding technique possible.
  6. Reduced material consumption. Use less welding consumables by being able to minimize the amount repetitive arc on-time by students and instructors of the same welding process.
  7. Better curriculum development. Using cameras provides a whole new dimension in developing a better curriculum for welding courses by allowing instructors to employ digital video content in their classroom.
  8. Differentiation from schools without Weld Cameras in classrooms. Let’s face it – attracting students is a tough job and your school is competing with other schools across town and around the world.  The more appealing you can make your program will raise its appeal to prospective students.
  9. More students moving through existing facilities, faster. By providing students live and recorded content on a large display, more students can be learning via video.  The learning via video can happen while other students learn by doing, reinforcing the learning experience and doubling student throughput.
  10. Testing and verifying of new processes and techniques. When new equipment, process or technique is presented to your school, instructors could make a new video to test out the equipment or process, setting a standard for students to attempt to emulate.

With so many powerful reasons to introduce a weld camera into your curriculum, why wait? 

Contact Xiris today for a consultation.

Better Images. Better Decisions. Better Process Control.

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Topics: quality control, weld inspection, weld environment, High Dynamic Range, HDR, weld camera system, consistent, inspection system, educator, weld school

Decrease Injuries, Increase Efficiency and Prioritize Workplace Safety!

Posted by Leanne Sinclair on Tuesday, September 09, 2014 @ 05:28 PM

The construction of large ship vessels is a very complex and hazardous trade. In order to fabricate these large structures, there are various positions and maintenance that needs to be completed for proper assembly. Unfortunately, this increases the risk of accidents. As many shipyards use sub-arc welding, this process involves operators to be suspended high in the air, or exposed to different gases and hazards.

In 2011, two workers were fatally injured on the site of a Singapore shipyard, when a powerful explosion was caused due to the build-up of pressurized air. Fortunately, other team members were inside the nearby building attending a safety briefing when the accident occurred. The explosion shook the entire stretch near Benoi Road, and the loss of the two workers was mourned by various media outlets.  

Sadly, these types of accidents are common in this area of work. The article of this accident is accompanied with a chart that demonstrates that in 2007 14.3% of accidents occurring at shipyards were due to fire and explosions, most commonly associated with welding. The graph below demonstrates a study conducted by the Ministry of Manpower in 2013 of the Workplace Injuries by Industry and Degree of Injury. You will see that Construction, Manufacturing and Marine trades have the highest amount of fatalities and are the most common trades using welding.

table

 

These studies demonstrate the demand for increased safety in all of these trades, specifically shipbuilding. These huge constructions involve a variety of complex conditions and trades that need to be completed with efficiency and reliability. Risking a worker’s life by adding hazardous factors to an already dangerous trade is unnecessary and should be avoided. In order to complete reliable and quality welds, it is important that it is monitored, but this does not mean the operator must be where the weld occurs. With the development of welding cameras, injuries and fatalities in this industry can be largely reduced.

Systems such as the Xiris XVC-S Weld Camera for Sub Arc Welding can be added to conditions commonly seen in shipyards. This small addition could have large benefits, and large decreases in the high number of injuries and deaths seen in this prominent trade. It allows welds to be monitored consistently, from a safe distance, which would increase worker safety and efficiency.

 

Is your shipyard safe? Are your welds consistent and the best quality you can provide? Can you risk any more lost product, lost time, or employee safety?

To learn more about how Xiris Weld Cameras can benefit your business, please visit our website.

Topics: weld camera, weld inspection, weld environment, weld safety, Sub Arc welding, safety, camera, weld allignment, visibility, accident, fatal, death

Bring Welding Education into the 21st Century with Weld Cameras!

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, August 05, 2014 @ 04:28 PM

One of the biggest problems instructors face when teaching welding students is demonstrating proper welding techniques in a way that all students can see them.  The traditional solution has been to repeat the demonstration over and over to small groups of students so that everyone can see and understand what is going on.  This causes instructors to battle time pressure to perform all the required welding demonstrations within the limited number of class hours available.  Another problem with this solution is that students may not all see the same issues, or get the same level of explanation.  But that was with the traditional solution, and the 21st century brings better solutions for such issues.

NAIT Installed side

An example of the Xiris XVC-O View Camera, installed at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT)

Today, progressive welding educators do not need to face these century old issues.  By implementing a weld camera that can view the huge range of brightness present in an open arc welding environment (including the weld arc and its darker surrounding background), welding schools and colleges can provide their students with a clear view of the weld process. This allows instructors to explain and demonstrate what is really happening with the weld arc, as well as its immediate environment (such as the weld seam, weld pool, shielding gas, wire feed and other inputs).  Furthermore, this allows students to receive the same demonstrations and explanations of one weld, and provides a more consistent teaching method for welding educators.

By using a camera that can generate a clear view of the weld parameters, educators can get better use of their facilities as they can train more students in less time. They can also eliminate space restrictions of larger classes, enhance students’ basic understanding of the welding process, and enhance their school’s reputation amongst prospective students with the addition of small but evolutionary camera.

For the students, the implementation of a welding camera can create a more enjoyable learning experience, requiring less time to gain the skills needed, and raise the perception of welding as an advanced trade and skill. 

By using a weld camera, educators can create new ways to deliver education, such as recording videos of good quality welds for off-line review by students. These videos can also be used for marking or testing purposes, and the implementation of 21st century learning technique: online learning of welding processes!

For more information about our educator packages, prices and offers, please visit our website or contact us directly at sales@xiris.com

Topics: weld camera, weld environment, welding instruction, Education

How to Get the Best View of an Open Arc Weld

Posted by Cameron Serles on Thursday, July 17, 2014 @ 06:00 PM

Attaining a good image of a weld and the surrounding background has been a struggle ever since video cameras for welding became available.  The problem has always been the range of brightness that occurs during welding: the ratio between the maximum and minimum light intensity is usually too great for a standard camera to measure properly.  Standard cameras on the market today can typically measure about 1,000 levels of brightness between the maximum and minimum light levels in an image.  However, in a typical open arc welding environment, there is a brightness range that can exceed 10,000,000 levels of brightness between the brightest portion of the welding arc, and the darker areas surrounding the weld.  Using a standard camera to image such a weld will create an image similar to the image below on the left, where the camera sensor will image the scene up to a point and then saturate when it gets too bright. This causes the bright areas of the image to appear as a white blur.

 

To solve this problem, Xiris Automation has developed the XVC-O View Camera that uses advanced electronics with logarithmic sensitivity to be able to see more than 10,000,000 levels of brightness in an image.  As a result, more image detail is visible than ever seen before. The detail of the weld arc, the shielding gas, weld pool, torch tip, and weld seam can all clearly be seen.  The image below on the right is an image taken from the XVC-O camera of an open arc welding process. The weld arc is no longer saturated and is clearly visible as is the detail of the background, providing better quality information for the weld operator.

 

GOOOOOOD resized 600       Standard Camera Image of a Weld                      Xiris XVC-O Camera Image of a Weld

With the ability to see more detail of the weld arc and the surrounding environment, welding technicians are able to use the XVC-O to better control their welding processes through better quality assurance and process feedback. 

To see examples of the video quality possible with the XVC-O across a variety of welding processes and materials, please see our Weld Video Library here.

 

Topics: weld camera, weld inspection, Laser welding, welding automation, weld environment, Machine Vision, image processing, Education, Welding Process, weld video, Xiris, image contrast

How System Integrators Use Xiris Weld Cameras in Automation

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, June 10, 2014 @ 03:15 PM

Systems integrators who build automated welding processes are always searching for improved business models. There are thousands of small and medium sized automation system integrators around the world that are experts in the industry. This challenges each company to differentiate themselves from their competition, and do so by providing a unique value proposition to their customers.

One of the best ways to gain this competitive advantage is for system integrators to leverage rapidly evolving technology. By applying it to their customer’s welding automation solutions this allows companies to capitalize on an evolving technology, with the goal of improving profitability and efficiency.

An emerging technology that many systems integrators are considering is the use of cameras for monitoring the welding process.  While cameras have been used to monitor welding for years, it is only recently that cameras, such as the Xiris XVC-O Open Arc Weld Camera, have provided enough image clarity that system integrators have considered them a useful tool to provide to customers. 

welding line resized 600

 

Many system integrators face the same challenge:  how to build a system to keep operators from having to be in direct proximity of the automated cell in order to monitor the weld.  Most fabricator customers are increasingly dissatisfied with automated welding solutions that don’t permit operators to monitor the weld remotely.  By providing a camera to monitor the welding process, systems integrators can provide their customers with a valuable production tool.

Adding a camera system to a work cell can help increase welding automation business that might not otherwise be gained by a systems integrator. By removing the operator from the immediate work area of the welding environment there are immense benefits to the customer that would increase demand for a system integrator. For example, instead of multiple operators assigned to multiple production lines to manage rollers, material handling, and welding processes, customers benefit from having one operator per line at one control panel managing it all, increasing productivity, quality and reducing human error.

By introducing weld cameras into automated welding work cells, systems integrators can achieve an abundance of benefits. They will be able to differentiate themselves in the market, expand into new market sectors, improve technical competency, as well as improve the functional excellence of the overall product offering.

Topics: remote monitoring, quality control, weld camera, welding automation, weld environment, Machine Vision, camera placement, field of view, Welding Process, Xiris

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