The Xiris Blog

XVC-S for Subarc Weld Monitoring: A Case Study

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, July 19, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

The Xiris XVC-S Weld Camera system was recently profiled in a Subarc Welding case study by LJ Welding Automation of Edmonton, AB.

The XVC-S camera system was chosen as “a key component for remote viewing and easy, safe and efficient adjustment of welding head during set up and welding; laser pointers and cross-hair output on monitor included to make seam following easy for operator “

See the XVC-S in action here: 

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can enhance the quaity and economy of your Subarc and Open Arc welding processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, Sub Arc welding, weld monitoring, submerged arc welding

Two Types of Weld Cameras to Help You

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, October 21, 2014 @ 01:02 PM


Xiris Automation Inc. designs inspection systems, or “machines that can see”. Our products are used for process and quality control and provide some of the world’s most dynamic manufacturers with the ability to detect, recognize, and interpret quality issues in their manufactured goods. These technologies are applied across many different industries to improve safety, efficiency and productivity. We have developed camera technology to help monitor both Open Arc welding and Sub Arc Welding processes which has significantly enhanced the welding industry.


Xiris View Cameras: Open Arc Welding

Welding cameras can make a drastic difference in manufacturing and quality control for Open Arc welding processes such as GMAW (MIG/MAG), GTAW (TIG), Plasma or Laser welding. By integrating a camera at the weld head, fabricators can improve the human interpretation of the weld quality by providing a better image than otherwise possible and therefore decrease the chances of human error. The Xiris View Camera for Open Arc welding (XVC-O) is a complete system that comes with monitor, software, and camera, and can be easily integrated to any automated welding process. Beyond the production line, the system can also be used as a training tool, inside and outside of the classroom. With video recording capabilities, the XVC-O allows instructors to record welds and defects for offline review, analysis and instruction. The result is a better tool to teach welding to more students, as well as a way to introduce a more consistent assessment and review process.

XVC-O_Monitor_image

The XVC-O monitor display

Xiris View Cameras: Submerged Arc Welding

Monitoring Submerged Arc welding is less difficult than Open Arc welding processes because of the blanket of flux that covers the welding process. The blanket of flux used in Sub Arc Welding prevents spatter and sparks but ensuring the alignment and angle of the weld tip is still essential to ensure the quality of the resulting weld. In addition, monitoring the continuously fed wire is another feature that needs monitoring in order to ensure the consistency of pressure of the arc. The Xiris View Camera for Submerged Arc Welding (XVC-S) provides clear images of the weld environment, weld tip and feeder wire to the operator in order to more accurately control the parameters that make a good weld. It also removes operators from potentially hazardous work environments without sacrificing their ability to monitor the weld process.


Welding injuries are far too common in today’s work environment and any steps that can be taken to improve workplace safety as well as productivity should be taken. Just last year, a Texas-based company says an explosion on a Mexican oil platform off the Louisiana coast was caused by unsafe welding practices. This report followed not one, but four lawsuits against the company asking for $20 million each in actual damages, plus a total of $100 million in punitive damages*. Safety concerns such as these could be reduced with the introduction of a Xiris Weld Camera. Let us help you prioritize safety and efficiency.

 
The XVC-O comes in both a standard and advanced system, and can be easily integrated into a manufacturing line, or the classroom. To learn more about our products and services please visit our website www.xiris.com or contact our sales team directly at sales@xiris.com.

 *This information was collected from the following article: http://www.nola.com/traffic/index.ssf/2013/08/consultantprivate_report_says.html

Topics: weld camera, Welding Process, Sub Arc welding, camera, weld allignment, arc welding, accident

How to Improve Your Sub Arc Business

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, October 14, 2014 @ 12:59 PM


The submerged arc welding process is used in a variety of industries all that work with thick, heavy and expensive materials. Many of these industries also perform cladding, where weldment material is added to the base material to improve its wear resistance. In many cases, having a cladding process located near the sub arc welding process can increase the health and safety risk for operators who must monitor the welding process close by. Instead, a welding camera could be added to the submerged arc welding process (SAW) to assist the operator in monitoring the process remotely, providing a number of benefits:


1. Cost Savings

One of the first and most substantial benefits a welding camera provides to the SAW process is to eliminate an abundance of rework and set up time. By adding a camera to remotely monitor the welding process, operators can ensure that all welds are lined up correctly and make immediate adjustments if necessary while welding. This reduces scrapped material as well as any machine down time in order to reset the process.

2. Safety Benefits

Remote monitoring of the sub arc welding process provides health and safety benefits to the welding operators by:

o   Removing them from a high heat environment without having to compromise their monitoring of the welding process. By working remotely to monitor the weld process, the operator has a quieter, cleaner, healthier work environment while still being able to control the weld alignment and surrounding environment.

o   Removing them from dangerous monitoring positions. Some sub arc welding tasks require operators to monitor the weld process from immense heights, or tight spaces in order to ensure weld quality and process efficiency. A welding camera with a remote display screen allows the operators to view the weld in a less hazardous environment, improving employee safety without sacrificing quality.

Xiris View Camera for Submerged Arc Welding

The Xiris View Camera for Submerged Arc Welding (XVC-S)

3. Eliminates Failure Rates

As already mentioned, SAW involves a lot of costly, heavy materials, many that are used in industries such as shipbuilding. In this high demand, high quality industry, there is no room for failure or risk of low quality welds. It is absolutely crucial that every weld involved is durable, reliable, and of the best standard of quality. The addition of a weld camera would allow an operator to eliminate a possible failure, by monitoring the process as it occurs.

4. Automation Benefits

As the demand in industries such as shipbuilding, bridge-building, spiral pipe applications and green energy technology increases, the demand and expectations of the quality of SAW processes continue to rise. By using automation to improve the consistency and repeatability of SAW processes, fabricators can better meet the quality requirements of their customers. As more advanced technology allows for the manipulation of material, spinning and moving the weld as it occurs, this can make monitoring more difficult. The addition of a welding camera would allow the weld head to be easily installed to most automation equipment, moving with the material or weld torch as it moves.

Secondly, in terms of changing materials, sizes or processes in general, the addition of a welding camera would allow automation lines to changeover much more quickly through faster set ups. As the automation equipment is prepared to run again, the operator can speed the set up process quicklyprocess quickly, making adjustments on the fly so that there is minimal scrap or lost time when changeover begins


There are numerous benefits to adding a welding camera to a SAW process. With the ability to remotely monitor the position, alignment and operation of the weld tip, operators can reduce down time, increase productivity and improve weld quality.

The Xiris product line includes cameras that can be used in both submerged and open arc welding processes, and can be found on our website.
See the benefits yourself by adding a weld camera today!


 

Topics: quality control, Sub Arc welding, camera, applications, productivity

Decrease Injuries, Increase Efficiency and Prioritize Workplace Safety!

Posted by Leanne Sinclair on Tuesday, September 09, 2014 @ 05:28 PM

The construction of large ship vessels is a very complex and hazardous trade. In order to fabricate these large structures, there are various positions and maintenance that needs to be completed for proper assembly. Unfortunately, this increases the risk of accidents. As many shipyards use sub-arc welding, this process involves operators to be suspended high in the air, or exposed to different gases and hazards.

In 2011, two workers were fatally injured on the site of a Singapore shipyard, when a powerful explosion was caused due to the build-up of pressurized air. Fortunately, other team members were inside the nearby building attending a safety briefing when the accident occurred. The explosion shook the entire stretch near Benoi Road, and the loss of the two workers was mourned by various media outlets.  

Sadly, these types of accidents are common in this area of work. The article of this accident is accompanied with a chart that demonstrates that in 2007 14.3% of accidents occurring at shipyards were due to fire and explosions, most commonly associated with welding. The graph below demonstrates a study conducted by the Ministry of Manpower in 2013 of the Workplace Injuries by Industry and Degree of Injury. You will see that Construction, Manufacturing and Marine trades have the highest amount of fatalities and are the most common trades using welding.

table

 

These studies demonstrate the demand for increased safety in all of these trades, specifically shipbuilding. These huge constructions involve a variety of complex conditions and trades that need to be completed with efficiency and reliability. Risking a worker’s life by adding hazardous factors to an already dangerous trade is unnecessary and should be avoided. In order to complete reliable and quality welds, it is important that it is monitored, but this does not mean the operator must be where the weld occurs. With the development of welding cameras, injuries and fatalities in this industry can be largely reduced.

Systems such as the Xiris XVC-S Weld Camera for Sub Arc Welding can be added to conditions commonly seen in shipyards. This small addition could have large benefits, and large decreases in the high number of injuries and deaths seen in this prominent trade. It allows welds to be monitored consistently, from a safe distance, which would increase worker safety and efficiency.

 

Is your shipyard safe? Are your welds consistent and the best quality you can provide? Can you risk any more lost product, lost time, or employee safety?

To learn more about how Xiris Weld Cameras can benefit your business, please visit our website.

Topics: weld camera, weld inspection, weld environment, weld safety, Sub Arc welding, safety, camera, weld allignment, visibility, accident, fatal, death

See Xiris in Beijing June 10-13, 2014.

Posted by Dean Zhao on Tuesday, May 27, 2014 @ 03:00 PM

Since signing Harbin Jinlifeng Co. Ltd as our distributor for China in January this year, Xiris has established success in selling a few Xiris XVC-O weld camera systems to Chinese customers. To support our expanding business in China, Xiris will exhibit in the 2014 Beijing Essen Welding and Cutting Fair from June 10 – 13 alongside our local partner, Harbin Jinlifeng.

The Beijing Essen Welding and Cutting Fair is one of the world’s leading welding exhibitions, it is the largest and the most influential welding trade fair held in China each year.  In 2013 the fair had almost 25,000 visitors from over 50 countries, and over 1,000 exhibitors from 28 countries.  Anticipating an even bigger show this year, Xiris expects to be very busy!

Come visit us at Booth# E1710 in Hall E1 of the show, where we will be demonstrating the XVC-O weld camera for Open Arc welding, and the XVC-S weld camera for Submerged Arc welding. Using leading-edge technology our XVC-O weld camera has an extremely high dynamic range sensor, which allows the operator to see both the weld arc, and its surrounding background simultaneously.  Equipped with an HMI console and monitor, the XVC-O allows the operator to remotely view the weld information up to 40 m away. This means the operator can monitor, and record, the weld process for online or offline viewing.  The system is enclosed in a cooled, durable housing to allow the camera to work in extremely harsh environments.

We are looking forward to the show, and hope you will stop by to see what our weld cameras can do!

See you in Beijing!

 

beijing

Topics: quality control, weld camera, weld inspection, Machine Vision, Xiris, High Dynamic Range, Sub Arc welding, Trade Show, distributor

Xiris Goes to China!

Posted by Dean Zhao on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 @ 12:03 PM

Xiris has extended its salesforce into the world’s largest and fastest growing market – China.

After signing Harbin Jinlifeng Science and Technology Development Co. Ltd (Jinlifeng) to be the exclusive Chinese distributor of Xiris Products for the welding industry, Cameron Serles, President of Xiris, decided to visit our new Chinese partner in January 2014 along with Dean Zhao, Project Manager for the weld camera product line.

We arrived at Harbin, China, in early January to -25°C temperatures!  Dr. Sanbao Lin, the Vice Director of the State Key Laboratories for Advanced Welding and Joining (State Key Lab), met us at the airport.  Dr. Lin is well known in the Chinese welding community as a welding pioneer and consultant to many companies in different industries across China such as aerospace, nuclear, ship building, automotive, tube mills etc.  His research team is specialized in arc welding techniques and welding process monitoring and control.

Our trip began by visiting the State Key Lab of welding. This lab is part of Harbin Institute of Technology which is one of the top ranked universities in China. The lab was the first welding lab established in China, equipped with all kinds of welding related equipment available from all over the world.  Now, the lab will be equipped with one more piece of welding equipment – the Xiris XVC-O Weld Camera System.  We installed and tested our XVC-O Weld Cameras on a number of welding setups: MIG, tandem MIG, TIG, Plasma on aluminum and MIG on aluminum. We demonstrated the system to various graduate students and trained them how the system works. They were able to see features previously not possible:  the wire feeds in a tandem MIG welding process, the keyhole in plasma welding, weld puddles and weld pools in both MIG and TIG welding. 

Blog 280114 Xiris in Harbin resized 600

L to R:  Cameron Serles – President, Xiris Automation Inc / Dr.Lin - Vice Director of the State Key Laboratories for Advanced Welding and Joining of Harbin China / Dean Zhao – Project Manager, Xiris Automaton Inc.

The following day, we visited Harbin Welding Institute (HWI), the largest welding research & development institute in China. HWI has two major subsidiaries: welding material development and welding automation equipment division, one of the largest welding automation companies in China. Headquarters of the China Welding Association, Chinese Welding Society, and Chinese Committee for Welding Standardization are all located in HWI. We met the general manager of HWI’s welding automation group, Mr. Zhang and the sales manager of both groups, Mr. Wu. We introduced Xiris and Xiris weld products to HWI. HWI also gave us an introduction of the institute and took us to their automation shop. They showed us various welding automation projects, including small diameter pipe cladding, underwater laser cutting for the nuclear industry, and multi-torch welding systems. Roughly they had about 30 projects on their floor to be shipped to their customers in the next few months.

Later in the day, we met the general manager of Jinlifeng, Ms. Li. Jinlifeng is specialized in reselling industrial computers and related equipment and will be our distributor for China.

Summary of our findings in our Harbin Trip:

  • Harbin is the centre for welding in China, with famous institutions like State Key Lab and HWI there.
  • China’s welding market is enormous with the huge amount of infrastructure being built.
  • There is a lot of semi-automated welding equipment be used in China. Some of these systems are now being slowly transformed into fully automated welding processes.
  • There is some good technology being developed and used in China for welding!

Topics: weld camera, Laser welding, welding automation, Sub Arc welding, labor market, Harbin

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