The Xiris Blog

Fall Tradeshow Recap

Posted by David Giannotti on Tuesday, December 17, 2019 @ 10:15 AM

After another busy quarter, we are taking a look back at some of the major trade shows we attended that helped define a successful fall season for Xiris.

Fabtech 2019 – November 11 – 14, Chicago, USA

Our most important trade show of the Fall was to Fabtech 2019, in Chicago, USA. Being North America’s largest metal forming, fabricating, welding and finishing event, it offered the perfect opportunity to meet world-class fabricators, distributors, machine builders, and end users.  Our new camera, the slimline XVC-700 was introduced at Fabtech to great acclaim by other exhibitors and visitors alike, which made the show that much more special for us!  Xiris was proud to have over 15 cameras on display in 8 different exhibitor’s booths around the show. As the tradeshow went on, it was great to see the excitement from customers as they learned how Xiris weld cameras can allow them to clearly monitor their welding processes. Fabtech 2019 provided a great venue for Xiris to show off its existing and new weld cameras and demonstrate how they can impact welding process and quality control.

Formnext 2019 – November 19 – 22, Frankfurt, Germany

In late November, Xiris travelled to Frankfurt, Germany to exhibit in the leading global trade fair for additive manufacturing (industrial 3D printing).  With over 34,500 visitors from around the world representing aerospace, automotive, energy, medical and additive manufacturing (AM) end user markets, it was an amazing experience to be a part of the largest Formnext to date. Our focus at the show was on the value our cameras can provide for characterizing additive manufacturing processes, especially direct energy deposition. It is apparent that the industry is desperately seeking a solution to process characterization as the reception for Xiris weld cameras was excellent.  Equipment makers, powder suppliers, end users and researchers at Universities and research institutions all expressed keen interest in the Xiris weld camera technology.

TUBE Southeast Asia 2019 – September 17 – 24, Bangkok, Thailand

Xiris also attended some other smaller shows such as the Tube Southeast Asia show in Bangkok, Thailand. At this show, Xiris was able to make potential customers aware of its latest sales presence with an office in Kuala Lumpur. During the show, Xiris had the pleasure of meeting with a variety of global partners, including both new and existing partners from tube fabrication and various metal working industries where we demonstrated the tube weld inspection system and our XVC weld cameras, sparking discussion on the show floor.

Metalex Vietnam 2019 – October 10 – 12, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Metalex Vietnam 2019, held in conjunction with the RobotX and Welding Vietnam shows was held at the Saigon Exhibition and Convention Center in the middle of October 2019. Attended by Xiris’ APAC Director, David Garrard, it was a great opportunity to meet with existing partners and key welding-related exhibitors from all over Southeast Asia, India and China. The attendance of this tradeshow aided in the successful introduction of Xiris XVC weld cameras into the APAC region.

Topics: Xiris, welding, Trade Show

What Does Welding Sound Like? SMAW

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, December 03, 2019 @ 01:00 PM

“Most welding shop foremen who interview welders give them a weld test and know from halfway across the shop by the sound of the weld if that welder will pass the test.”1 This quote from GoWelding.org highlights how important sound is in welding. This is why our team at Xiris has added audio monitoring to our popular weld cameras.
SMAW- Audio in Welding

Since launching our audio package, we have been diving into audio monitoring in more detail, talking about how monitoring audio can benefit operators and what to listen for in GMAW and GTAW. Today, we’re looking—and listening—in more detail to SMAW, or stick welding.

Like GMAW, SMAW should sound like cooking bacon.2 If the arc sounds overly loud, your amperage might be set too high.3

To set up your welder, strike an arc and listen to the crackle of the rod. Adjust the power setting (amperage) until you hear the sound of bacon or eggs frying.2

It may take years for welders to amass the experience necessary to recognize what quality welds sound like. As you are welding, it is important to pay attention to the sound of your stick welds. Soon, you will be able to determine if you have a quality weld.

This video shows SMAW in action and shares what it sounds like in a variety of situations: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akvv4ApYMVE.

 

 

Better Images. Better Decisions. Better Process Control.

Follow Xiris on social media for regular updates and welding videos!

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Sources: 

1http://gowelding.org/welding/stick-smaw/

2https://quizlet.com/125850644/welding-smaw-shielded-metal-arc-welding-flash-cards/

3https://www.millerwelds.com/resources/article-library/five-steps-to-improving-your-stick-welding-technique

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, weld monitoring, audio, SMAW

How To Engage Young Welding Apprentices

Posted by David Giannotti on Wednesday, November 27, 2019 @ 10:00 AM

 

Welding has a problem. We all know about it, but we often don’t talk about it.

First of all, the average age of welders is creeping up. In both America and Europe it is almost 60 years old, similar over much of the Western world. Even in China, with many younger welders who entered the work force in the past few decades, the average age of welders is increasing.

Secondly, for a generation growing up with computers, smartphones and video games, many young adults today are more comfortable using a keyboard than they are using their hands to make things, such as fabricating metal with welding. The reality is that a lot of youth are naturally streaming into disciplines that involve computers, in clean work environments, far away from the dirtier, more basic environment in which processes such as welding are done.

Thirdly, young graduates from technical schools want to be continuously learning, not only about their core technology, but about processes around it, to make their work more interesting and appealing.

So, what to do? Perhaps it is time to rethink how to engage young welding apprentices. Adding automation to a process is certainly a good first step to remove the more mundane aspects of a repetitive, difficult welding process. It introduces a component of technology that will certainly increase the interest level of those young students.

But maybe automated welding should be taken a step further. Perhaps the addition of weld cameras to a welding process will expand the interest of a younger crowd and better engage them. By having weld cameras on the welding equipment, you do not need an operator to be present right at the welding torch to monitor what is going on. Instead, they can be on the ground, remote from the welding process, using a computer with a keyboard to monitor and control the welding process, possibly even from a clean office environment! How cool would that be?



By adding automation and weld camera technology to the welding process, fabricators can better engage new welding apprentices entering the workforce to their welding roles with improved health and safety conditions, different ways to make their work more interesting and improved opportunities to learn. 

Topics: Education, Xiris, welding

What Does Welding Sound Like? GTAW

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, October 29, 2019 @ 11:30 AM

To accompany the launch of Xiris’ new audio monitoring technology, we are continuing our series about sound in welding. So far, we have covered the announcement of our audio monitoring equipment, benefits of adding audio to your weld camera, and sound in GMAW

Today we are investigating sound in GTAW, or TIG welding.
GTAWGTAW is typically characterized by a high-pitched hum or buzz.1

The polarity of the electrical current—whether it’s AC or DC—affects sound in TIG. AC TIG is much louder than DC. As amperage increases, welding noise will also increase.2

At lower frequencies, you will hear a slow pulse sound as you weld. One operator described it as “Braaap, Braaap, Braaap.” As the power frequency increases, such as to 80-90 hz, the sound becomes “sharper:” “BRAP, BRAP.” With the frequency between 100-120 hz, the “brap” sound becomes a whine. At this point, the arc is moving much more quickly, going from positive to negative hundreds of times a second.2

As in GMAW, sound in GTAW can alert operators to mistakes or faults in their welding.

For example, a torch-to-workpiece angle greater than 20-25 degrees may cause a popping sound as well as poor weld quality.3 A high pitched buzzing sound can signify lower penetration of the heat into the parent material.4

An important consideration in monitoring sound in welding is the environment that you’re working in. Each shop or factory has its own unique acoustics. Some frequencies may echo and welding machines can seem very loud or sound different depending on where they’re located.

For this reason, it is important to spend time assessing your welds, monitoring your equipment and learning what a good weld sounds like in your facility.

Watch a video of welding aluminum with GTAW, and how the frequency settings change the sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzsfBV6_vNY

 

Better Images. Better Decisions. Better Process Control.

Follow Xiris on social media for regular updates and welding videos!

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Sources: 

1https://weldtalk.hobartwelders.com/forum/weld-talk-topic-archive/welding-processes/12469-a-few-questions-on-tig

2https://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?23153-AC-TIG-Aluminum-Noise

3https://forum.millerwelds.com/forum/welding-discussions/3973-sound-of-tig-welding

4https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzsfBV6_vNY

 

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, GTAW, weld monitoring, audio

Xiris Celebrates 30 Years!

Posted by David Giannotti on Tuesday, September 24, 2019 @ 10:00 AM

Xiris is pleased to celebrate its 30th anniversary in September, 2019. Founded 30 years ago by Cameron Serles, the business was set up to commercialize the budding technology of machine vision, using cameras to acquire images and send to computers to process those images. Back in 1989 when the company started, most manufacturers were highly skeptical of the possibility of cameras being able to inspect manufactured goods by measuring the size or shape of manufactured goods. As a result, the first few years were tough until the technology slowly gained acceptance, initially in the automotive and semiconductor industries, then eventually being embraced into all kinds of applications across all forms of manufacturing and materials processing.

Xiris LogoOver the years, Xiris developed inspection systems for the automotive, semiconductor, electronics, pharmaceutical, steel, plastics, compact disc and printing industries.For the past 10 years or so Xiris' focus has been on the metal fabrication industry.

We would like to thank everyone who has contributed to our success over these past three decades. We would not have been able to do it without all of our customers, partners, and employees. Our team at Xiris Automation Inc. is grateful for our journey thus far and we are looking forward to another 30 years of advancing inspection technology.

Topics: quality control, welding

Robust Weld Cameras for High Frequency Weld Applications

Posted by Catherine Cline on Wednesday, May 03, 2017 @ 09:29 AM

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) that is generated by high frequency weld equipment can often play havoc with other welding equipment, such as cameras, by creating electromagnetic induction in the circuitry of the cameras.  Often the electrical disturbances that occur create a noisy camera image, interrupt image data acquisition or generate continuous lines running through the image. In xtreme cases, it can stop the cameras from functioning altogether.

May 3 image 1.png 

The Xiris XVC-1000e Weld Camera

During extensive testing in the field, Xiris XVC weld cameras have proven themselves to be immune to the EMI that is generated by high frequency weld equipment.  EMI immunity has always been a problem identified by the industry when using cameras, so Xiris took this into consideration when designing the XVC camera family.  The camera is an all digital design, rather than the analog design common on most other weld cameras.  The result is that many problems resulting from outside interference are eliminated, allowing for excellent image stability and cable lengths of up to 100 m.  As part of that design, the camera housings have been extremely well shielded and grounded, eliminating any stray electrical noise.

The XVC weld cameras were extensively tested during the design/build process whereby extreme ranges of frequencies and power levels were used, including some of the harshest welding conditions, such as high power GMAW welding tests, with power approaching 1000A.  During those tests, the XVC weld camera cables were stretched parallel to welding power lines, wrapped around welding power lines and laid on/over/in grounded equipment, all without significant degradation of the camera image.

The camera has been tested to the EN 61326-1:2006 standard which includes the following tests:

  • Electrostatic discharge
  • Radiated RF Immunity
  • Electrical Fast Transients
  • Surge Withstand
  • Conducted RF Immunity
  • Magnetic Field Immunity
  • Voltage Dips
  • Short Interruption
  • Harmonic Current Emissions
  • Voltage Fluctuation and Flicker

The Xiris XVC weld camera is now widely used on manufacturing floors running in some of the most challenging welding environments, including alternating polarity GTAW, high powered GMAW and Plasma processes, providing clear images to operators as far as 100 m away from the weld head.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can eliminate EMI interference and enhance your weld processes visit Xiris.com 

You can visit our

 WELD VIDEO LIBRARY

for dozens of examples of the camera in action. 

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Topics: quality control, image processing, Xiris, welding, productivity tools, EMI

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