The Xiris Blog

Rugged, Robust, and Ready to Use - The XVC-S Sub Arc Weld Camera

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Thursday, November 01, 2018 @ 09:00 AM

Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) is a common welding process used in a variety of applications pipe and pipeline fabrication.  In many applications, pipe is tack welded together to hold the pipe in shape, then submerged arc welded from the outside using a continuous process such as on a spiral welded pipe mill, or in butt joining pipe segments using an orbital welding process.  Many of these applications have a very confined or awkward working environment that makes it difficult, if not impossible, for a human to observe the weld process in a production environment.

XVC S Column and BoomAn XVC-S Mounted to a Column and Boom Robot Performing Welding and
Cladding on Large Pipes

In any such welding work environment, whether it be the confined space of a pipe welding application or a high-height welding application such as in large pressure vessel construction, operator safety is always a priority. In the welding industry, workforce demands, government regulations, changing business practices, and increasing environmental awareness are driving the manufacturing environment to be safer, healthier, and friendlier for workers. As a result, the use of camera technology is becoming more prevalent in order to alleviate some of the dangers and liabilities.

While the welding environment is particularly harsh on electronics, the Xiris XVC-S cameras for Sub-Arc welding applications have proven to be very durable and reliable in some of the toughest environments. The XVC-S cameras have been used in hot, confined spaces to provide a clear view of the submerged arc weld torch and its alignment to the weld seam, or in a post-weld application to inspect the weld as the slag comes off the weld bead. The cameras allow the operator to remotely view and manage the welding process by providing the ability to adjust the weld process real-time, ultimately reducing potential subsequent rework.  For the fabricator, this means saving time and money with less machine stops and more on-arc time.

XVC-S ViewThe View of the Sub Arc Welding Process Using an XVC-S Camera

But the benefits of the XVC-S are not just financial: since the XVC-S submerged arc weld camera allows the welding processes to be viewed remotely, operators can monitor the welding process from the comfort of a process control cabinet as the cameras are placed at the weld head.  As a result, welders are no longer required to work in cramped, uncomfortable places or dangerous heights, reducing fatigue and safety issues.

With clearly demonstrated financial benefits from cost savings and improved health and safety considerations, the business case for implementing an XVC-S camera is straightforward.  Don’t you think it’s worth looking into a camera for your sub arc business? Learn more about the XVC-S camera and download the FREE Datasheet for more details. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Topics: submerged arc welding, Sub Arc welding, XVC Weld Camera, pipe, Xiris, Robotic Welding, welding automation, weld inspection

Xiris in Shanghai, Tube China 2018

Posted by Dean Zhao on Thursday, October 18, 2018 @ 10:30 AM

 

Just a couple of weeks ago, Xiris had the opportunity to showcase our Weld Inspection Systems at Tube China in Shanghai. This was a four-day trade show which ran from September 26th to the 29th. Tube China has grown into Asia’s most influential tube and pipe industry event and attracts tens of thousands of visitors to thousands of leading brands. As the show has grown over the years, it has been fascinating to see the visitor interest grow as well. Participants were significantly more informed about the various technologies and were asking insightful questions as a result.

Xiris-Belwin Booth Weld-Inspection-System

The live demonstration of our laser-based 3D inspection system, the WI2000, resonated with many visitors as they could see it detect various quality issues on smaller diameter tubes. In collaboration with our Chinese distributor, Belwin Intelligent Technology Co, we are able to better accommodate our customers overseas.

If you have any questions about Xiris’ Weld Inspection Systems, or are trying to choose the right system for your process, please visit our website or contact us directly.

Topics: Trade Show, Tube China 2018, weld inspection

SPC Measurements on a Tube Mill

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, April 10, 2018 @ 02:58 PM

Statistical Process Control (SPC) is the use of inspection data to determine the characteristics of a process, using techniques to find and remove abnormal variations in completed tubes.  Variable data is quantitative and is generated from actual measurements, such as the Mismatch, Bead Height, Deflection or similar measurements obtained from the Xiris WI2000 Weld Inspection system when it is placed right after the weld box on a tube mill. 

Variation is the difference between things that should be alike because they were produced under the same conditions.  Variation can be measured and groups of these measurements can be plotted as a frequency distribution, or histogram.  Since quality is a measure of conformance to specifications, poor quality results when variation falls outside the upper and lower specification limits.

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The SPC Data Logging Utility Display from a Xiris WI2000 system

 

SPC data can now be recorded and reviewed off line using the WI2000 measuring a number of parameters, including: 

  • Mean - the average of a group of values of a particular measurement.
  • Median -  the middle value of a group of ordered measurements.
  • Mode - the measurement occurring with the highest frequency.  This is the peak of the histogram.  In a true normal distribution, the mean, median and mode are all equal.
  • Range - the highest minus the lowest value in a set of measurement data.  This is a simple measure of the dispersion, or spread, in a set of data.
  • Standard Deviation - a measure of dispersion computed from the square root of the sum of the deviations from the mean, divided by the total frequency. 

Statistical process control uses the concept of subgroup sampling.  This is a method of data collection that considers a series of consecutive measurements together as a single group.  A typical subgroup size is five (5) measurements.  In order to smooth out the variability associated with an individual measurement, five consecutive measurements would be considered together as a representative sample. 

Xiris has implemented an SPC measurement logging capability to provide a way for fabricators to monitor their tube mills and identify abnormal variations in their completed tubes.

 

Topics: Tube and Pipe welding, weld inspection

Checking Tube Welds Before and After Scarfing

Posted by Cameron Serles on Wednesday, December 07, 2016 @ 10:01 AM

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The process of tube welding requires several variables to be in check for efficient and stable production and to meet the quality demands of the industry.  Mill dynamics, from setup to production, have an impact on the stability of these variables.  Measuring and monitoring these variables is the first step in controlling them and improving weld quality for tube fabricators.

In response, tube fabricators employ laser based weld inspection systems to monitor a variety of geometrical features around the weld area of the tube and to provide early warning of quality issues related to the welding and forming process.  Traditionally placed right after the weld box on a tube mill, where the majority of tube forming and weld bead measurements can be made, such systems provide the operator with an early warning of weld related process variations that could lead to quality defects.  

While most tube mill customers use the system right after the weld box where the most as-weld related information is available, some fabricators use it after scarfing to check for quality issues related to the scarfing process: does the scarfing tool cut too deeply, or not enough?  Is the tool damaged?  Is the scarf cut a consistent amount?  All these questions can be addressed by installing a weld system after scarfing.

Now, Xiris has developed a double head laser based weld inspection system that allows for one head to be placed immediately after the weld box and one head immediately after scarfing.  In this way, tube fabricators can monitor their tube production before scarfing for weld related defects; and after scarfing for potential scarf related issues.

 

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WI2000 Double Head Configuration: One Head Post Weld, One Head Post Scarf

 With a double head configuration, tube fabricators can better control their process and improve quality by monitoring the tube profile, weld bead geometry and final scarf cut, all controlled from a single system. 

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com or sign up to receive the Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: Xiris, quality control, scarfing, weld inspection, weld seam, weld camera, Tube and Pipe welding

Xiris Helps Tube Producer Eliminate Weld Problems

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 @ 10:08 AM

Xiris’ WI2000 Weld Inspection System measures weld bead and formed tube geometry for tube and pipe producers.  Recently, the WI2000 was featured in an article in the Tube and Pipe Journal, where it was identifed as a major reason why Middletown Tube of Ohio, USA was able to improve its tube quality and reduce its scrap rate.

Providing more benefits than was expected, the WI2000 has helped the tube producer find defects with their mill equipment and setup; catching potential defects before they become failures and cause scrap.  As a result, tube mill setups have become a science rather than an art for Middletown.

Read the full article here.

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For more information on how Xiris Weld Inspection Systems can improve the quality and productivity of your tube and pipe production, visit Xiris.com 

You may also be interested in our Weld Video of the Month 

Topics: Xiris, welding, productivity tools, quality control, weld inspection, Middletown Tube, Tube and Pipe welding

Post Scarf Inspection on Tube and Pipe Mills

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, June 30, 2015 @ 09:54 AM

Scarfing is a process of removing excess weld bead on a pipe or tube to create a desired shape.  It is done by planing longitudinally welded tubes or pipes right after the welding process.  If it is done perfectly, the resulting profile will match the ideal shape of the parent material.  However, if the scarf tool is set to plane too much material, or not enough, the resulting profile could appear too deep or leave a weld bead above the parent material.

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Result of a Scarf Tool Cutting Too Deeply
 
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Result of a Scarf Tool Not Cut Deep Enough
 

Detecting if the scarf tool is properly adjusted is a difficult task to do on a continuous basis.  In particular, some thick walled tube and pipe mills make precision end products using multiple scarf cuts using scarfing tools operating sequentially.  If not correctly adjusted, the tube or pipe could end up with an incorrect profile shapes where the scarf occurred.  A way to make sure that the right amount of material is removed from the welded tube is important.  If placed after the scarfing process on a tube mill, the Xiris WI-2000p can measure the scarf width and bead height left behind after a scarfing process to provide quality control of the scarfing process itself.

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Image of an Ideal Scarf Zone from the WI-2000p from Xiris

 

In the above image taken from a WI-2000p system, a laser profile is shown of a welded tube, post scarf.  The area of the scarfing does not reflect the laser line as well, so the scarfed area can be easily detected and measured.  As the scarf cuts deeper into the material, the scarf width will increase, as it cuts shallower, the scarf width will decrease.

Conclusion

Measuring the scarf area of a tube or pipe with a device such as the WI-2000p Weld inspection system from Xiris is a quality control tool to ensure that the scarfing process has been set properly and not cutting too little or too much of the parent material away.


 

Would you like to see what the Xiris XVC-1000 has to offer?  Subscribe to the Weld Video of the Month Club to receive exclusive video content recorded by our own XVC-1000

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 For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com 

Topics: weld inspection, Tube and Pipe welding, scarfing, WI-2000p

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