The Xiris Blog

Using Weld Cameras For Torch Alignment

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, August 16, 2016 @ 11:09 AM

When Xiris demonstrates its weld camera systems, one of the unexpected benefits an operator notices right away is the ability to quickly align the torch and seam.   Xiris weld cameras have integrated LED’s that provide a nice bright image of the seam and torch prior to starting the weld process.  Before we begin our demonstration, we ask the operator to align the torch and the seam which is usually done manually with a visual check.  Once we are told the system is aligned, we ask the operator to look at the computer screen and, 90% of the time, the torch and seam are misaligned.  The operator then begins to use the weld camera system right away to achieve perfect alignment on a consistent basis.

Here are three videos that demonstrate the alignment process.  In these examples the manufacturer has installed a positioning sensor on the robotic arm which is meant to ensure perfect torch alignment during each weld and the operator simply verifies the alignment prior to welding.

Operator Alignment:

The positioning sensor and the operator have misaligned the torch, resulting in a bad weld.

 

 

Weld Camera Assisted Alignment:

The operator has used the weld camera system to verify the alignment and you will see the adjustments that were made after the robot had been aligned.  Not only do the cameras ensure accuracy, the operator can perform the alignment quickly, right from the console rather than bending, stretching or climbing up on to the equipment to achieve proper alignment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can ensure accurate alignment of your torch and weld seam, visit Xiris.com

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, High Dynamic Range, productivity, color weld camera, weld seam, weld seam alignment

Using a Light Meter for Automatic Weld Monitoring

Posted by Cameron Serles on Tuesday, August 02, 2016 @ 02:30 AM

With the advent of high dynamic range weld cameras such as the Xiris XVC-1000, images of welding processes can be made with enormous ranges of brightness.  As a result, it is now possible to monitor and record good quality video of most welding processes using an HDR camera.  With good quality images of the weld pool, arc and seam, the next logical step is to incorporate image processing into the camera system to extract additional information to help operators better control the welding process.

One of the most basic tools for image processing is a LightMeter.  The LightMeter tool from Xiris provides statistical information about the pixel values in an area of interest.  It can be used as an overall measure of the intensity of a weld process, detect part or feature presence, or be the first step in performing powerful image processing on an area of interest.

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Figure 1 : LightMeter Window

The LightMeter generates a histogram based on the light intensities of the pixels in an area of interest, calculating a number of statistics, including:

Median – the brightness level that separates all the pixels in the area of interest into two equal halves.

Mean - the average brightness of all the pixels in the area of interest

Mode - the pixel brightness level that appears most often in the area of interest.

Minimum - the value of the darkest pixel in the area of interest.

Dark Tail – the pixel value at which a specific percentage of the total number of pixels in an area of interest are found to be darker.

Bright Tail - the pixel value at which a specific percentage of the total number of pixels in an area of interest are found to be brighter. 

Maximum – the value of the brightest pixel in the area of interest.

Standard Deviation – the amount of variation or dispersion of brightness levels of all the pixels in an area of interest.

Sum – the addition of all the pixel values in the area of interest.

These measurements can be used as building blocks by users and developers to create automatic inspection algorithms to measure welding features and parameters with the goal of performing a level of process or quality assurance.

A sample histogram with some of the key features is displayed below:

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Figure 2: Sample Histogram

Conclusion:

By incorporating image processing tools such as a LightMeter tool into their weld camera systems, machine builders can measure features of their weld processes in a way that has never before been possible.  It is now possible to find and measures levels of light across an entire image, or in a region of interest in an image.  This can provide information about features of the weld, such as the weld wire, melt pool or weld seam, that could allow for further monitoring or analysis, or form the foundation for seam tracking or weld pool geometry analysis.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras and the LightMeter image processing tool can enhance the quaity and economy of your welding processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld camera, image processing, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, area of interest

XVC-S for Subarc Weld Monitoring: A Case Study

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, July 19, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

The Xiris XVC-S Weld Camera system was recently profiled in a Subarc Welding case study by LJ Welding Automation of Edmonton, AB.

The XVC-S camera system was chosen as “a key component for remote viewing and easy, safe and efficient adjustment of welding head during set up and welding; laser pointers and cross-hair output on monitor included to make seam following easy for operator “

See the XVC-S in action here: 

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can enhance the quaity and economy of your Subarc and Open Arc welding processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, Sub Arc welding, weld monitoring, submerged arc welding

Weld Revolution Uses the Xiris Color Weld Camera

Posted by Catherine Cline on Tuesday, July 05, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

Last week Xiris Automation was given the opportunity to work with the team at Weld Revolution and record some footage with the new XVC-1100 color camera.   

Weld Revolution’s SpinArc® welding torches utilize a high speed rotating weld arc to enable the welding of all metals in any position using either metal-cored or solid wires in spray transfer or pulse modes.  

The unique stirring action delivers clean robust welds and is extremely effective for narrow groove welding.  The above video, captured with the XVC-1100 color weld camera, shows how smooth and consistent the SpinArc® process welds as it travels down a 3” deep groove and as a result, the weld bead typically requires little or no beveling.

Even with the incredible brightness of the arc and the outer walls of the narrow groove, the XVC-1100 colour camera was able to automatically adjust and deliver an excellent picture with detail of the melt pool, side wall tie-in, alignment, heat effected zone, and even wire spin.

   
For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras can help with your Orbital Welding applications, visit Xiris.com

Topics: quality control, weld camera, welding, High Dynamic Range, weld pool, productivity, color weld camera

Edge Detection for Weld Monitoring

Posted by Cornelius Sawatzky on Tuesday, June 21, 2016 @ 02:00 AM

With the advent of high dynamic range weld cameras, such as the Xiris XVC-1000, images of welding processes can be made with enormous ranges of brightness.  As a result, it is now possible to monitor and record good quality video of most welding processes using an HDR camera.  With good quality images of the weld pool, arc, and seam, the next logical step is to incorporate image processing into the camera system to extract additional information to help operators better control the welding process.

The Edge Detector tool from Xiris is a powerful edge detection and analysis utility that can detect edges, or areas of rapid contrast change, within a region of interest.  When used with a weld camera, the edge detector can help find the size and position of numerous features in a welding scene such as wire width and length, weld seam gap or center, molten pool boundaries or torch tip edge quality.

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Figure 1: Edge Detector window

The Edge Detector generates a projection of intensities from a region of interest into a profile, then analyzes the profile to find presence of edges.  Each edge has a series of properties such as edge strength, expected polarity and location that can be used to measure or sort each edge so that objects in the weld environment can be analyzed.  The net result is a new way for fabricators to enhance the monitoring and controlling of their weld processes.

 Conclusion

By incorporating image processing tools such as an Edge Detector into their weld camera systems, machine builders can measure features of their weld processes in a way that has never before been possible.  It is now possible to find edges in an image, such as the weld wire, or seam, that could allow for further monitoring or analysis, or form the foundation for seam tracking or weld pool geometry analysis.

For more information on how Xiris Weld Cameras and the new Edge Detector tool can help monitor your weld processes, visit Xiris.com

Topics: weld video, Xiris, welding, High Dynamic Range, R&D, edge detection